Endless Shout: taisha paggett’s counts orchestrate, a meadow (or weekly practice with breath)

Add to Calendar

1/4: taisha paggett, counts orchestrate, a meadow (or weekly practice with breath), 2016, Institute of Contemporary Art. Photo by Ryan Collerd.
2/4: taisha paggett, counts orchestrate, a meadow (or weekly practice with breath), 2016, Institute of Contemporary Art. Photo by Ryan Collerd.
3/4: taisha paggett, counts orchestrate, a meadow (or weekly practice with breath), 2016, Institute of Contemporary Art. Photo by Ryan Collerd.
4/4: taisha paggett, counts orchestrate, a meadow (or weekly practice with breath), 2016, Institute of Contemporary Art. Photo by Stacey MacDonald.

In conjunction with its ongoing interdisciplinary project Endless Shout, the Institute of Contemporary Art presents choreographer and performance artist taisha paggett’s counts orchestrate, a meadow (or weekly practice with breath). Throughout the two-day presentation, paggett and choreographer Meena Myrygesan will perform a replica of a rehearsal within the gallery space, using time and breath to develop movement that responds to the works on view in the ICA’s group exhibition The Freedom Principle.

These events are free and open to the public.

Endless Shout is a multi-artist project examining the role of performance in museum spaces. Over the course of six months, six artists—designer Raúl de Nieves, dancer Danielle Goldman, choreographer taisha paggett, composer George Lewis, poet Fred Moten, and artist collective The Otolith Group—collaborate on an experimental series of dance, music, poetry, multi-media installations, and interactive programs. The project addresses questions about how, why, and where performance can occur, and whose voices are represented within cultural spaces.


References

Percussionist and Pew Fellow Pablo Batista presents a work-in-progress showing of his forthcoming Center-funded project El Viaje (The Journey), as part of The Barnes Foundation’s Free First Sunday series.

Grants & Grantees

The company is dedicated to making critically important performance opportunities available to the current generation of opera and theatrical performers, designers, and directors.

Grants & Grantees

Theater artist Thaddeus Phillips, a 2002 Pew Fellow, will create a new bilingual performance work for theater, inspired by his experience working on Colombian telenovela Alias El Mexicano.

Grants & Grantees

Amy Smith is a dance artist, a founder of Headlong Dance Theater, and a 2006 Pew Fellow.

Grants & Grantees

Gabrielle Revlock will developed a new dance-theater work with past collaborator Nicole Bindler that explored the nature of creative collaboration, as well as themes of gender, competition, and spectacle.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Travis Preston is dean of the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) School of Theater and artistic director of the CalArts Center for New Performance.

Grants & Grantees

Voloshky Ukrainian Dance Ensemble restaged dances with new recordings in preparation for national and international tours.

In the fall of 2011, Pig Iron Theatre Company embarked on a new chapter in its history as an experimental theater collaborative, launching the Pig Iron School for Advanced Performance Training.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Eric Booth, author of The Music Teaching Artist’s Bible, is widely regarded as one of America’s most creative and effective teachers of the arts.

Grants & Grantees

Dorothy Wilkie’s (Pew Fellow, 2007) choreography involves the re-staging and re-choreographing of traditional West African and Afro-Cuban dances.

Collaborators & Colleagues

William Parker is a leading figure in the New York creative jazz scene. Renowned as a composer, bassist, and multi-instrumentalist, he is also an educator and author.

At the February launch of the Center’s new multimedia online publication, A Steady Pulse: Restaging Lucinda Childs, 1963–78, Lucinda Childs and Judy Hussie-Taylor, executive director of Danspace Project, discussed Childs’ career and artistic influences.