Sidi Larbi’s Play and Shantala Shivalingappa’s Namasya

Photo by Koen Broos. Pictured: Shantala Shivalingappa Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui.

A highlight of the 15th annual FringeArts Festival (then the Philadelphia Live Arts Festival) was the American debut of Play, a performance work by international choreographers and dancers Sidi Larbi and Shantala Shivalingappa. They performed this duet for the first time in the United States, and Shivalingappa also presented her solo program, Namasya. Born in India and raised in Paris, Shivalingappa practices the classical, expressive Indian dance form of Kuchipudi. Her program Namasya concentrated on contemporary choreography commissioned for the artist. Larbi’s interest in the framework of cultural identity reflects his background as a Belgian-born dancer with a Muslim father and Catholic mother. Larbi and Shivalingappa “examine the connection between contemporary art-making and traditional approaches” and “incorporate personal identity and ethnic background” into their work.

A full schedule of activities took place around the presentation of Larbi and Shivalingappa, and addressed the current impact of cross-genre and cross-cultural work that characterizes the dance landscape. These activities were designed for local artists and audiences who wished to learn more about South Asian dance in a global context. They included film screenings; a rare week-long workshop in the Indian martial art form Kalaripayattu for selected Philadelphia dancers; and a day-long symposium that explored intercultural dance and practice in North America, South Asia, Africa, and the African Diaspora.

In the third iteration of the Center’s danceworkbook series, Dr. Linda Caruso Haviland introduces three performed lectures by Foster.

Grants & Grantees

Pew Fellow Robert Matthews’ drawings are representational with varying degrees of narrative. They are not illustrations but rather investigations of unsolvable questions.

A conversation with Pew Fellow Jumatatu Poe, Donte Beacham, and LaKendrick Davis on the underground dance style of J-Sette and how Poe drew on its legacy for Private Places, a new Center-funded work.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Jaye Allison is a dancer and founder of Philly Tap challenge, whose work in the tap genre has been vital in keeping Philadelphia’s rich tap legacy in the public eye.

Collaborators & Colleagues

David White is the executive and artistic director of The Yard, the chair of the National Council at the Atlantic Center for the Arts, and the principal and manager of Public Imaginations.

The Institute of Contemporary Art presents a performance of Pew Fellow Jumatatu Poe’s Let ‘im Move You, organized by Danielle Goldman.

Grants & Grantees

MacArthur Fellow and visual artist Ann Hamilton, whose installations incorporate textiles and fabric, will create a major off-site installation and organize a loan exhibition of historical and contemporary fabrics.

Grants & Grantees

As a presenting arts organization, the Painted Bride offers a wide range of work in music, dance, spoken word, and theater.

Collaborators & Colleagues

John King is a composer, guitarist, and violist and the recipient of the 2009 Alpert Award in the Arts for Music.

The Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance is autobiographical and presents a running story in which Xavier, a 2013 Pew Fellow in the Arts, is both narrator and dancer.

Grants & Grantees

Known for its high energy performances, Koresh Dance Company was founded in 1991 by Israeli-born choreographer Ronen Koresh.

Revisit Center-funded The Dance Apocalypse in Brooklyn with The Dance Apocalypse/Solos. Creators Gabrielle Revlock and Nicole Bindler describe the piece as ” a radical challenge to the paltry circumstances in which artists seek funding and a heart wrenching end-of-the-world love story with pizazz.”