This Town Is a Mystery

1/6: Tobie Hoffman performs in Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town Is a Mystery. Photo by Kevin Monko.
2/6: Kendra and Calvin McQueen perform in Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town Is a Mystery. Photo by Kevin Monko.
3/6: Tobie Hoffman performs in Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town Is a Mystery. Photo by Kevin Monko.
4/6: Princess Bostick and Adam Bostick rehearse in the studio for Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town Is a Mystery. Photo by Andrew Simonet.
5/6: Kendra, Kassean, and Kenya McQueen rehearsing in studio for Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town Is a Mystery. Photo by Andrew Simonet.
6/6: Andrew Simonet, Adam Bostick, David Brick, Lea Bostick, and Princess Bostick in rehearsal for Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town Is a Mystery. Photo courtesy of Andrew Simonet.

Headlong Dance Theater has been one of Philadelphia’s most audacious and innovative performance groups, known for previous projects such as CELL and Hotel Pool, which utilized unexpected venues and asked audience members to join the performances. Continuing in that path, This Town Is a Mystery brought dance directly into the private homes of Philadelphia citizens—where the members of those households became the dancers. Interested in creating accessible dances and developing new audiences, often in nontraditional venues, Headlong took this project into various neighborhoods of Philadelphia, where company members worked with non-dancers toward the creation and performance of 25-minute dance-theater works, performed in their homes in front of small audiences, and followed by group dinners. Headlong partnered with Raíces Culturales Latinoamericanas and Scribe Video Center to locate participant homes for the project. This Town Is a Mystery was performed in four homes across 32 performances during the 2012 FringeArts Festival.

References

Philadelphia choreographer Nichole Canuso presents a solo performance, originally Center-funded, that uses personal reminiscences and universal yearnings to explore the relationship between memory and self.

Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, founding director of Urban Bush Women, reflects on her artistic evolution and the importance of living on the “edge of failure.”

Grants & Grantees

Melanie Stewart Dance Theatre creates performance with a focus on devised work that often includes forays into pop culture, political satire, and the human condition.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Before retiring in 2010, Joseph Carvalho served as the executive director of Springfield Museums in Springfield, MA.

Grants & Grantees

The Leah Stein Dance Company is committed to making dances spontaneously, rigorously, in collaboration, and in connection with the moment, often as site-specific works.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Richard Maxwell, playwright and director, is the artistic director of New York City Players and a two-time Off-Broadway Theater Award winner.

Over its 18-year history, Montgomery County Community College (MCCC) Lively Arts Series has engaged local and national artists to share their work with the college and surrounding Blue Bell community.

Grants & Grantees

Tristin Lowe is an installation artist and a 1995 Pew Fellow.

Grants & Grantees

Two of India’s preeminent artists, Carnatic vocalist T.M. Krishna and bharata natyam dancer Priyadarsini Govind, will fuse classical South Indian music and dance in a world premiere that is the culmination of a two-year artistic collaboration, and is inspired by themes of liberty and freedom drawn from Philadelphia’s history.

“Rogers + Rudner: Then + Now,” co-presented by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage and Dance/USA Philadelphia on September 29, 2007, culminated in a discussion with the two pioneer postmodern dance artists.

A number of Center-supported performances take the stage this summer, including seven new musical commissions by The Crossing and the world premiere of Pablo Batista’s music and dance production El Viaje (The Journey).

The Free Library of Philadelphia is the city’s public library, with 54 locations serving more than six million users annually.