John Jasperse’s Fort Blossom

1/3: John Jasperse’s original Fort Blossom. Photo by Maria Anguera de Sojo © 2000. Pictured: Miguel Gutierrez and John Jasperse.
2/3: John Jasperse’s original Fort Blossom. Photo by Maria Anguera de Sojo. © 2000. Pictured: Miguel Gutierrez, John Jasperse, Parker Lutz, and Juliette Mapp.
3/3: John Jasperse’s original Fort Blossom. Photo by Maria Anguera de Sojo. © 2000. Pictured: Miguel Gutierrez, John Jasperse, Parker Lutz, and Juliette Mapp.

The Bryn Mawr College Performing Arts Series presented noted contemporary choreographer John Jasperse’s Fort Blossom Revisited, created in 2000 and previously performed only at The Kitchen in New York City. This grant supported the college providing a distinctive context for the work through workshops, a symposium of scholars and artists, and an interactive Web forum where audience members shared their individual responses to Fort Blossom. Dance critic Anna Kisselgoff wrote in the New York Times, following the piece’s premiere in 2000, that “new ways of moving are at the heart of [Jasperse’s] work, and his dramatic images […] can be startling.” Fort Blossom pays close attention to parts of the body that are usually overlooked in dance—with slow-moving, precise choreography that is awkwardly beautiful. Dance writer Suzanne Carbonneau, in her project commissioned essay, wrote that this work, “finds rapport in the fundamental commonality of our bodies.” Jasperse writes that Fort Blossom asks the audience to acknowledge the human body as “simultaneously special, even miraculous, and ordinary.”

References

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