FRAME

1/2: Courtesy of New Paradise Laboratories.
2/2: Courtesy of New Paradise Laboratories.

New Paradise Laboratories (NPL) is an experimental performance ensemble that has reshaped conventional notions of theater with productions that harness social media and new technology as vital tools for audience participation. In Fatebook (2009), over 14,000 people from 137 countries interacted with the show’s “characters” via Facebook, ultimately shaping the content of the live production. The 2012 production Extremely Public Displays of Privacy asked viewers to visit sites around Philadelphia, where they accessed exclusive performance clips via cell phone and mobile device.

NPL built a new Web-based engagement tool called FRAME, which invites audiences to participate and collaborate with NPL’s theater artists online, providing NPL with a constant source of inspiration. FRAME is maintained by a new position of FRAME coordinator, who acts as the social network’s online coordinator and works with NPL performers to generate and curate content in this online space. The FRAME coordinator’s work is supplemented by a connectivity coordinator, who works more broadly with social media tools in addition to the website presence. NPL plans to expand its reach to audiences beyond Philadelphia and use FRAME to actively participate in international conversations, in order to boost creative momentum. The FRAME project has been the focus of considerable attention in the media, including articles in American Theatre and Mashable.1

References

1
Management grants, through the Philadelphia Cultural Management Initiative, were awarded through 2013 following which a new funding category, Advancement grants, was introduced to support substantial long-term organizational development. Learn more>>.
Grants & Grantees

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Grants & Grantees

Art-Reach connects audiences with disabilities or economic disadvantages to the arts, serving as a conduit for those who want access to performances or cultural institutions.

Grants & Grantees

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Questions of Practice

Hong, director of academic affairs and program development at the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University, looks at the opportunities presented by co-authorship through the lens of entrepreneurship.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Samuel Hoi has served as President of Los Angeles’ Otis College of Art and Design since 2000.

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Collaborators & Colleagues

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Questions of Practice

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Grants & Grantees

Jackie Tileston is a visual artist and a 2004 Pew Fellow.

Grants & Grantees

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