Strategic Plan and Leadership Transition

As the Philadelphia Folklore Project (PFP) faced a major institutional turning point with the planned retirement of its founder and longstanding director, it developed a strategic plan for 2012–16 that mapped out a path for leadership transition and developed new programming models for the future. As part of the process, PFP interviewed local and national peers in the fields of folklore, community arts, and grassroots activism, and used the data gained from those surveys to design three planning gatherings. The discussions at these gatherings, which involved PFP staff, board members, artists, and audience members, investigated the potential of PFP’s past work and focused on ideas around community and cultural development, education, and documentation. They formed the basis for a strategic plan that includes clear transition steps, fleshed-out descriptions of staff skills and responsibilities, and new ideas for fundraising and integration of new media. The plan became the basis for a 2013 Project Grant, which will implement the succession plan and launch PFP’s new project, the Folklore Congress.1

1
Management grants, through the Philadelphia Cultural Management Initiative, were awarded through 2013 following which a new funding category, Advancement grants, was introduced to support substantial long-term organizational development. Learn more>>.
Grants & Grantees

Wu Peter Tang is a musician and a 2004 Pew Fellow in folk and traditional arts.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Thomas F. DeFrantz directs SLIPPAGE: Performance|Culture|Technology and teaches in dance and African and African-American Studies at Duke University.

Grants & Grantees

In 2007, the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 83 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

In fall 2011, the Association for Public Art was featured in USA Today Travel as “the main reason Philadelphia is now said to have more public art than any other city.”

Collaborators & Colleagues

David Levine is an artist working in theater, performance, video, and photography. In 2015, Levine served as an LOI panelist in Performance.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Susan Franano offers services through Franano Arts Management Consulting following nine years as executive director of the Tucson Symphony Orchestra.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Lee Rainie is the director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project, a nonprofit, non-partisan “fact tank” that studies the social impact of the Internet.

Whitney Kimball, Vox Populi’s third AUX Curatorial Fellow, will give a curatorial lecture regarding her interest in collectivism and the contemporary collaborative urban performance art context in East Coast cities.

Grants & Grantees

The Wilma Theater created the Wilma Vision Fund, a cash reserve raised and maintained by the board of directors in order to sustain high standards of performance.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Since 2006, Kinshasha Holman Conwill has served as deputy director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Smithsonian Institution’s newest museum, scheduled to open in 2015.

Whitney Kimball, Vox Populi’s third AUX Curatorial Fellow, presents artist talks from Jeanine Oleson and Jaimie Warren, the fourth program in the “Schmart World” series.

Grants & Grantees

InterAct Theatre Company is committed to producing socially and politically relevant work for theater.