Available Light

1/5: Lucinda Childs’ Available Light in performance at the Drexel University Armory as part of the 2015 FringeArts Fringe Festival. Photo © Jacques-Jean Tiziou. Courtesy of FringeArts.
2/5: Available Light at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 1983. Photo by Tom Vinetz. Performers: Lucinda Childs, Nan Friedman, Meg Harper, Janet Kaufman, Priscilla Newell, Steve Bromer, Michael Ing, Erin Matthiessen, Daniel McCusker, Ande Peck, and Garry Reigenborn.
3/5: Available Light at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 1983. Photo by Tom Vinetz. Performers: Lucinda Childs, Nan Friedman, Meg Harper, Janet Kaufman, Priscilla Newell, Steve Bromer, Michael Ing, Erin Matthiessen, Daniel McCusker, Ande Peck, and Garry Reigenbor.
4/5: Available Light at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 1983. Photo by Tom Vinetz. Performers: Lucinda Childs, Nan Friedman, Meg Harper, Janet Kaufman, Priscilla Newell, Steve Bromer, Michael Ing, Erin Matthiessen, Daniel McCusker, Ande Peck, and Garry Reigenborn.
5/5: Available Light at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 1983. Photo by Tom Vinetz. Performers: Lucinda Childs, Nan Friedman, Meg Harper, Janet Kaufman, Priscilla Newell, Steve Bromer, Michael Ing, Erin Matthiessen, Daniel McCusker, Ande Peck, and Garry Reigenborn.

FringeArts will produce a re-imagined production of Available Light—a multidisciplinary work by choreographer Lucinda Childs, architect Frank Gehry, and composer John Adams—at its September 2015 festival in Philadelphia. Originally conceived as a site-specific work for the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art in 1983, in which a warehouse performance space became an integral part of the event, Available Light will be restaged at a Philadelphia location to be determined. Julie Lazar, the curator who commissioned the work by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, will join the artists, who will be reunited for the first time. Dance scholar Suzanne Carbonneau, who participated in FringeArts’ 2010 Center-funded presentation of Childs’ DANCE, will helm ancillary events, including a public conversation with Childs, Gehry, Adams, and Lazar.

Flamenco purists may consider Israel Galván a rebel, though he doesn’t see it that way.

Flamenco master Rosario Toledo will present a series of performances entitled TAPAS: the culmination of a month-long residency with Philadelphia artists Eun Jung Choi, Meg Foley, and Germaine Ingram.

Grants & Grantees

Nicole Cousineau (Pew Fellow, 2007) makes multimedia dance theater based in strong, rigorous movement investigation.

Grants & Grantees

The Wilma Theater produced the American premiere of the first new play in 20 years by renowned playwright and former President of the Czech Republic, Václav Havel.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Billie Tsien, with Tod Williams, founded Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects in 1986. Their studio, located in New York City, focuses on work for institutions—museums, schools, and non-profits.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Jens Hoffmann is the deputy director for exhibitions and public programs at The Jewish Museum in New York City.

Grants & Grantees

The Community Education Center has grown into an arts organization with a focus on cultivating a support system for artists, supported through residency and service programs.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Dance and choreographer Megan Bridge co-directs < fidget >, a platform for her collaborative work with composer, designer, and musicologist Peter Price.

In this collaboration, Meredith Rainey researched and developed a new work that explored perception through the vehicle of the famous Rorschach test.

Grants & Grantees

Kun-Yang Lin/Dancers’ company training project furthered the development of the meditative and martial arts practices at the core of their creative process.

Grants & Grantees

Merián Soto continued to develop the Branch Dance Series, a deeply meditative, multimedia performative process that became the basis for her piece in the 2009 FringeArts Festival.