New Play Frontiers

People’s Light & Theatre Company’s New Play Frontiers was the first play development program in the company’s 37-year history. The project brought playwrights from across the country to the theater’s campus to develop new work inspired by the region’s diverse communities. The process was overseen by a cross-departmental committee, made up of artistic programming, education, development, and marketing staff members. This committee established partnerships with local cultural, civic, religious, and academic institutions with a willingness to help unearth stories of significance. The committee selected writers for the residency program who demonstrated interest in local histories.

Six playwrights were selected for the Frontiers Residencies: Eisa Davis (Bulrusher, Pulitzer finalist), Colman Domingo (Wild With Happy), Kate Fodor (Hannah and Martin), Karen Hartman (Gum), Dominique Morisseau (Detroit ‘67), and Kathryn Petersen (Cinderella: A Musical Panto, Barrymore nominated). With additional support from the Mellon and Barra Foundations, People’s Light subsequently commissioned all six to complete the plays launched by the residencies. Zak Berkman, the program director, wrote about the project for HowlRound, the Theater Commons blog.1

References

1
Management grants, through the Philadelphia Cultural Management Initiative, were awarded through 2013 following which a new funding category, Advancement grants, was introduced to support substantial long-term organizational development. Learn more>>.
Collaborators & Colleagues

Lee Tusman is an independent curator based in Philadelphia whose projects straddle the intersection of ideas that are socially-based and urban in nature, with a focus on contemporary new media.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Kelly Kivland is an Assistant Curator at Dia Art Foundation, where she has been involved with exhibition and performance programs.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Dr. Ian Bogost is a video game designer, critic, and researcher. In fall 2012, he visited the Center as part of a series on “gamification” in the arts and culture sector.

Pig Iron Theatre Company’s Center-funded School for Advanced Performance Training was featured in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Grants & Grantees

Wyck will evaluate its current programming in advance of writing a new business plan that results in audience-centered programs with the potential to attract new visitors.

In the third and final segment of our three-part conversation with Center Visiting Artist Ain Gordon, he gives us a glimpse of how he has entered into conversations at the Center and proposed alternative possibilities for our approach to our work.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Ann Hamilton is internationally recognized for her large scale, multimedia installations.

The Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance launched this community outreach program in order to empower its member organizations to build relationships with local communities.

Grants & Grantees

Daisy Fried is a poet and a 1998 Pew Fellow.

Grants & Grantees

With support from the Center, the Arden has integrated visually dazzling video design into live productions and enhanced its work for young audiences.

In fall 2011, the Association for Public Art was featured in USA Today Travel as “the main reason Philadelphia is now said to have more public art than any other city.”

Collaborators & Colleagues

Tom Schorgl has been president and CEO of the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture since its inception in 1997.