Trisha Brown: In the New Body

1/10: Trisha Brown Dance Company, Set and Reset, Bryn Mawr College, 2015. Photo by Johanna Austin.
2/10: Artists of Pennsylvania Ballet in Trisha Brown’s O zlozony/O composite. Photo by Alexander Iziliaev, courtesy of Pennsylvania Ballet.
3/10: Artists of Pennsylvania Ballet in Trisha Brown’s O zlozony/O composite. Photo by Alexander Iziliaev, courtesy of Pennsylvania Ballet.
4/10: Trisha Brown Dance Company, Floor of the Forest. Courtesy of Bryn Mawr College.
5/10: Lillian DiPiazza in Trisha Brown’s O zlozony/O composite. Photo by Alexander Iziliaev, courtesy of Pennsylvania Ballet.
6/10: Trisha Brown Dance Company, Early Works (1968-75), The Barnes Foundation. Photo by Ted Alcorn.
7/10: Trisha Brown Dance Company, Set and Reset, Bryn Mawr College, 2015. Photo by Johanna Austin.
8/10: Trisha Brown Dance Company, Present Tense, Bryn Mawr College, 2015. Photo by Johanna Austin.
9/10: Trisha Brown, Set and Reset. Photo by John Waite, courtesy of Trisha Brown Dance Company.
10/10: Figure 8, performed by the Trisha Brown Dance Company. Photo © Thibault Gregoire, 2013.

Trisha Brown: In the New Body offered a retrospective of selected dances by Brown, an internationally known leader of post-modernism and an enduring renegade whose work has rarely been seen in Philadelphia. From September 2015 to June 2016, the project provided audiences with multiple opportunities to connect with Brown’s oeuvre as it evolved over time, and featured some of the Trisha Brown Dance Company’s final touring performances of Brown’s proscenium works. Spanning the major phases of Brown’s creative life, performances took place at Bryn Mawr College and The Barnes Foundation. In June 2016, Pennsylvania Ballet presented Brown’s O Zlozony/O Composite (2004), bringing two Polish poems to life in a company premiere for the Ballet, and becoming the first US ballet company to perform Brown’s choreography. A series of outside events conveyed the radical and influential shifts in dance practice that Brown engendered, with participating scholars Steve Paxton, Susan Rosenberg, Wendy Perron, Stephen Petronio, and others.


Additional unrestricted funds are added to each grant for general operating support.

References

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