Color Theory

1/5: PRISM Quartet performs with So Percussion in a Color Theory concert in June 2016. Photo by Scott Friedlander, courtesy of PRISM Quartet.
2/5: PRISM Quartet performs with the Partch ensemble in a Color Theory concert in June 2016. Photo by Scott Friedlander, courtesy of PRISM Quartet.
3/5: PRISM Quartet performs with the Partch ensemble in a Color Theory concert in June 2016. Photo by Scott Friedlander, courtesy of PRISM Quartet.
4/5: The PRISM Quartet. Photo by Jon Rohrer.
5/5: The PRISM Quartet. Photo by Jon Rohrer.

The PRISM Quartet creates and performs music that places the saxophone in unexpected contexts, charting fresh musical territory that challenges audiences. For Color Theory, PRISM will commission new works by Guggenheim Fellow Steven Mackey and Berlin prize recipient Ken Ueno, which will pair the saxophone with a wide range of percussion instruments, in order to investigate the concept of “musical color.” PRISM will partner with Partch, an ensemble devoted to American composer and musical instrument builder Harry Partch (1901–74), and Brooklyn-based ensemble Sō Percussion, for Color Theory concerts at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts. These concerts will be broadcast live on WWFM and a follow-up audio recording will be available on Innova Records. The project will also include panel discussions that examine color theory across disciplines; a Harry Partch lecture and instrument-making workshop; a composer symposium at the Curtis Institute of Music; and family workshops at the Free Library.

Additional unrestricted funds are added to each grant for general operating support.


Grants & Grantees

The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia presented a commissioned work by American composer and Guggenheim Fellow Steven Mackey.

Questions of Practice

Performance Senior Specialist Jeff Arnal looks to Philadelphia experimental trio Many Arms as he explores how musical groups form collective sounds.

Interdisciplinary artist Martha McDonald presents a site-specific installation and performance at RAIR’s recycling facility and artist space.

In commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Frankenstein, this exhibition will highlight two seminal Gothic works—Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel and Bram Stoker’s Dracula—through a selection of rare books, manuscripts, and artifacts to illustrate how these horror stories reflect ethical and scientific questions that continue to challenge us today.

Through the ongoing Center-funded project re-PLACE-ing Philadelphia, Painted Bride Art Center presents a new work by choreographer and Guggenheim Fellow Reggie Wilson.

Grants & Grantees

Founded in 2005 by Christine Cox and Matthew Neenan, BalletX unites distinguished choreographers with a company of world-class dancers to “forge new works of athleticism, emotion, and grace.”

Grants & Grantees

Robert Asman is a photographer and a 1997 Pew Fellow.

This month in Fellows Friday news: Vera Nakonechny is named a National Heritage Fellow by the National Endowment for the Arts, Alex Da Corte exhibits at White Cube, and much more.

During Dancing around the Bride’s run at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the exhibition received a string of glowing reviews from the New York Times.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Ronen Givony is the founder and artistic director of the Wordless Music Series and Orchestra, and the music director of SubCulture, both in New York City. He served as a Pew Fellowships panelist in 2011, and a Performance LOI panelist in 2015.

Grants & Grantees

The Kimmel Center, Inc., best known as a presenting organization and home of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Opera Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Ballet, is one of the most well-attended cultural venues in Philadelphia.

Edmunds, executive and artistic director of the Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA, is The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage’s first visiting scholar. Paula Marincola, the Center’s executive director, spoke with her about the opportunity.