A Fierce Kind of Love: Connecting Communities through Story and Dialogue

1/13: A Fierce Kind of Love. Photo by Jacques-Jean Tiziou.
2/13: Installation view of Here: Stories from Selinsgrove Center and KenCrest Services. Photo by JJ Tiziou.
3/13: A Fierce Kind of Love. Photo by Jacques-Jean Tiziou.
4/13: David Bradley and Suli Holum, playwrights for A Fierce Kind of Love, at a rehearsal. Courtesy of Temple University’s Institute on Disabilities.
5/13: A Fierce Kind of Love. Photo by Jacques-Jean Tiziou.
6/13: Ensemble of A Fierce Kind of Love. Photo by Christy Beck.
7/13: A Fierce Kind of Love. Photo by Jacques-Jean Tiziou.
8/13: The cast of A Fierce Kind of Love in rehearsal. Courtesy of Temple University’s Institute on Disabilities.
9/13: A Fierce Kind of Love. Photo by Jacques-Jean Tiziou.
10/13: Edith and Nicki take part in Lives Lived Apart, part of the programming around A Fierce Kind of Love. Courtesy of Temple University Institute on Disabilities.
11/13: A Fierce Kind of Love. Photo by Stephen Crout. Pictured: playwright Suli Holum and actor Michael McClendon.
12/13: A Fierce Kind of Love. Photo by Jacques-Jean Tiziou.
13/13: Evie and Helen take part in Lives Lived Apart, part of the programming around A Fierce Kind of Love. Courtesy of Temple University Institute on Disabilities.

Advocates in Pennsylvania played a significant role in the fight for disability rights, but these stories are largely unknown. A Fierce Kind of Love, a new play by theater artists Suli Holum and David Bradley, will recount these untold stories, revealing how past activism has informed present-day issues. The play is part of a series of public programs that will address questions of equity and inclusion, as well as issues around institutionalization, in order to generate public discussion beyond the disability community. The project as a whole is based on oral histories and interviews with advocates and self-advocates from the disability rights movement. The play’s cast will include people with intellectual disabilities. The Institute on Disabilities received a 2012 Discovery Grant for the planning of A Fierce Kind of Love.


Additional unrestricted funds are added to each grant for general operating support.

References

Grants & Grantees

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