Grants

Monument Lab: Creative Speculations for Philadelphia

1/2: Terry Adkins, Blanche Bruce, and the Lone Wolf Recital Corps perform The Last Trumpet as part of the Performa Biennial 2013. Photo courtesy of the Estate of Terry Adkins and Salon 94, New York.
2/2: Philadelphia City Hall courtyard, 2014. Photo courtesy of Paul Farber.

This project will pose the question: What does a 21st-century urban monument look like? The centerpiece of this exploration, overseen by curators A. Will Brown, Paul Farber, and Ken Lum, will be a temporary monument designed by the late, award-winning artist and University of Pennsylvania professor Terry Adkins, to be installed in City Hall’s central courtyard in the spring of 2015. Adkins’ monument addresses the traumatic wave of Philadelphia school closings that occurred in 2013. A Center City storefront “lab” also located at City Hall, which also opens in the spring of 2015, will serve as project headquarters, where participating artists, curators and Philadelphia citizens will brainstorm and instigate ideas for the appropriate monument for contemporary Philadelphia. This project will precede a planned Philadelphia monuments festival, to take place in 2017.

In an effort to deepen visitors’ curiosity about the arboretum’s plants, architecture, and history, the Morris Arboretum will develop mobile technology that provides instant access to a wide variety of content.

Organization

Megawords (run by Dan Murphy and Anthony Smyrski, both Pew Fellows) is self-described as “an experimental media project” that takes the form of a biannual photography magazine, as well as related installation projects and public events.

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts exhibited the first career retrospective for this American figurative painter of African descent, born and educated in Philadelphia.

Founded in 1812, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University is the oldest natural history museum in North America.

We asked our 2013 No Idea Is Too Ridiculous project facilitators, Kathleen McLean and Mark Beasley, to reflect on where they see constraints to doing creative work.

The opening celebration for “Barbara Kasten: Stages*, at the Institute of Contemporary Art.

Specimen Stories, a new pilot program at the Wagner Free Institute of Science, will assess the value and success of creative interpretive approaches with and for young adults.

Philadelphia Mural Arts Advocates has produced over 3,600 murals since 1984, making it the largest public art program in the United States and earning Philadelphia the nickname “City of Murals.”

Following the opening at Vox Populi, an Alien She and Riot Grrrl-inspired concert will take place at Johnny Brenda’s.

People

David Devan is the General Director and President of Opera Philadelphia, where he works on strategic planning initiatives and builds partnerships within the Philadelphia community and the opera world.

This month, Afaa Michael Weaver is awarded the $100,000 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, Joshua Mosley’s work appears at the Whitney Biennial, King Britt curates at MoMA PS1, and much more.

Valerie Cassel Oliver is senior curator at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston. She has organized numerous exhibitions that have earned national and international acclaim.

Organization

Wyck—a house, garden, and farm in the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia—served as the ancestral home to a Quaker Philadelphia family for over nine generations.

Frances Negrón-Muntaner is a filmmaker and a 1994 Pew Fellow.

Kiranavali Vidyasankar is a vocalist, music teacher, and writer who comes from a lineage of legendary Carnatic (South Indian) musicians.

Ingrid Schaffner, curator of Jason Rhoades, Four Roads, will deliver a public lecture on Jason Rhoades at The Kitchen, in New York, to launch the exhibition catalog, Jason Rhoades, Four Roads, published this summer.

Funeral for a Home has sought to generate critical thinking, discussion, and action around issues of housing redevelopment and preservation in Philadelphia. The project has received extensive media attention.

Cynthia Copeland is a public historian and interpretive specialist focused on Afro-American, American, urban, and museum studies as well as historic preservation and instructional technology.

International House Philadelphia, in collaboration with Ars Nova Workshop, presented a concert series that featured leading figures of the Free Jazz movement.

Scott Magelssen is associate professor of theater at Bowling Green State University, where he teaches theater history and performance studies, and is the editor of The Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism.

People

Tina Morton (Pew Fellow, 2010) left a career as an X-ray technician to pursue documentary filmmaking.

Sarah Sze’s installations, on view at the Fabric Workshop and Museum through April 6, 2014, received recent media attention from WHYY’s Newsworks.

People

Yane Calovski is a visual artist and a 2001 Pew Fellow.

Katharina Grosse’s epic psychylustro—a five-mile-long “painting” sprayed intermittently along a stretch of train tracks in northeast Philadelphia—challenges a number of assumptions about the role of both painting and public art. Interested in understanding how the project might be evaluated from different disciplinary perspectives, we invited a painter and an urbanist to share their thoughts.

One the first curators to radically re-think the contemporary art exhibition context, Siegelaub spoke with Gleadowe, a British art historian, prior to his passing in 2013 for a forthcoming book from the Center on structural innovation in exhibition-making.

New York choreographer David Gordon, a founding artist of New York’s Judson Dance Theater, worked with Susan Hess Modern Dance to re-envision his 2009 piece Uncivil Wars: Moving with Brecht & Eisler.