Boris Charmatz: Levée des conflits

1/9: Levée des conflits, Boris Charmatz, Drexel University Armory, 2016. Photo by JJ Tiziou.
2/9: Boris Charmatz leading a community workshop at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Photo by JJ Tiziou.
3/9: Levée des conflits, Boris Charmatz, Drexel University Armory, 2016. Photo by JJ Tiziou.
4/9: Levée des conflits, Boris Charmatz, Drexel University Armory, 2016. Photo by JJ Tiziou.
5/9: Levée des conflits, Boris Charmatz, Drexel University Armory, 2016. Photo by JJ Tiziou.
6/9: Boris Charmatz leading a community workshop. Photo by JJ Tiziou.
7/9: Community workshop with Boris Charmatz at Drexel Univeristy. Photo by JJ Tiziou.
8/9: Levée des conflits, Boris Charmatz, Drexel University Armory, 2016. Photo by JJ Tiziou.
9/9: Levée des conflits, Boris Charmatz, Drexel University Armory, 2016. Photo by JJ Tiziou.

Drexel University’s Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design brought acclaimed French choreographer and experimental dancer Boris Charmatz to Philadelphia for a residency and public presentation of his performance piece for 24 dancers, Levée des conflits (Suspension of conflicts), at Drexel’s Mandell Theater co-presented by FringeArts. Viscerally and conceptually compelling, Levée des conflits is a work for 24 dancers based on 25 repetitive movements that unfold over time. Each dancer develops a movement that is transmitted to the performers, accumulating in space, and building person by person, from a solo into more direct relationships and interactions, and finally expanding into a performance of the full series by the entire cast. The mesmerizing piece provides, in Charmatz’s words, “a blurring of the way one looks at the circulation, the passing, the appropriation of gestures [dance] that drift among a group.” Activities surrounding the performance included movement workshops with Philadelphia dancers, and a conversation between Charmatz and independent curator Simon Dove.


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References

Collaborators & Colleagues

James Alan McPherson is the recipient of many national literary awards, including a Pulitzer Prize and a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship award.

Grants & Grantees

Philadelphia Dance Projects produced the Local Dance History Project, reuniting five prominent Philadelphia dancers to examine the development of contemporary dance in the city.

Dove encourages artists to dance in unusual places. Why? Out of necessity, he says.

Grants & Grantees

Since 1980, Susan Hess Modern Dance has sought to grow the audience for contemporary dance and support independent dance artists in the Philadelphia community.

In 2013, the Center funded 52 projects, welcomed 13 new Pew Fellows, and brought to Philadelphia exemplary cultural practitioners from around the world for roundtable discussions and lectures.

Composer Judd Greenstein speaks to changing audience expectations in “an era where people are deluged with cultural products.”

Grants & Grantees

FringeArts will produce a re-imagined production of this seminal multidisciplinary work by choreographer Lucinda Childs, architect Frank Gehry, and composer John Adams at its September 2015 festival in Philadelphia.

Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture presents a talk by Dr. Dede Fairchild Ruggles on sound and scent in the Andalusian Garden, in conjunction with Words Adorned: Andalusian Poetry and Music.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Guillaume Pirard is a violinist who is a founding member of the chamber orchestra The Knights.

Grants & Grantees

Founded in Philadelphia in 1980, Piffaro performs 15th- through 17th-century music.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Pianist, composer/arranger, and educator Mike Holober serves as artistic director/conductor of the Westchester Jazz Orchestra and composer-in-residence with the Gotham Wind Symphony.

Grants & Grantees

Dorothy Wilkie’s (Pew Fellow, 2007) choreography involves the re-staging and re-choreographing of traditional West African and Afro-Cuban dances.