SaltSoul

1/13: Jungwoong Kim’s SaltSoul. Photo by Carlos Avendaño.
2/13: Jungwoong Kim’s SaltSoul. Photo by Carlos Avendaño.
3/13: Jungwoong Kim’s SaltSoul. Photo by Carlos Avendaño.
4/13: Jungwoong Kim’s SaltSoul. Photo by Carlos Avendaño.
5/13: Jungwoong Kim’s SaltSoul. Photo by Ben Harley.
6/13: Jungwoong Kim’s SaltSoul. Photo by Carlos Avendaño.
7/13: Jungwoong Kim’s SaltSoul. Photo by Ben Harley.
8/13: SaltSoul pop-up performance at Dilworth Park. Photo by Carlos Avendaño.
9/13: Jungwoong Kim’s SaltSoul. Photo by Ben Harley.
10/13: SaltSoul pop-up performance at Dilworth Park. Photo by Carlos Avendaño.
11/13: Video still from Moment of Silence at International House Philadelphia with dancer Jungwoong Kim and live music by Gamin Jungwoong, 2015. Courtesy of Jungwoong Kim.
12/13: SaltSoul pop-up performance at Dilworth Park. Photo by Carlos Avendaño.
13/13: Jungwoong Kim’s SaltSoul. Photo by Carlos Avendaño.

Choreographer and dancer Jungwoong Kim will examine the universality of sudden loss and trauma in a multimedia dance theater work integrating his heritage in traditional Korean dance with Western dance, improvisation, music, and found sound. The piece will be developed in collaboration with Marion Ramírez, Germaine Ingram, Merián Soto, and Korean musician Gamin Hyosung Kang. Kim will draw on both his personal experiences of losing a family member as a child, as well as two public disasters—a 2014 ferry accident in South Korea that killed more than 300 people, and a 2013 Philadelphia building collapse at 22nd and Market Streets, an event he witnessed—to create three performances that will ask audiences to reflect on how grief affects and connects us. Mobile scenery will guide audiences through multiple indoor and outdoor performance locations in Philadelphia’s Chinatown including the Asian Arts Initiative and nearby Pearl Street. An accompanying bilingual website will make the project accessible to audiences outside of Philadelphia, offering a window into Kim’s research, showing excerpts of the rehearsals and performances, and creating a platform for community members to connect.


Additional unrestricted funds are added to each grant for general operating support.

References

Collaborators & Colleagues

Noted abstract painter Thomas Nozkowski is known for his richly colored and intimately scaled paintings.

The Painted Bride Art Center commissioned an evening-length work by choreographer Cynthia Oliver, who also participated in a weeklong residency of workshops and film screenings.

At the February launch of the Center’s new multimedia online publication, A Steady Pulse: Restaging Lucinda Childs, 1963–78, Lucinda Childs and Judy Hussie-Taylor, executive director of Danspace Project, discussed Childs’ career and artistic influences.

Grants & Grantees

Scott Rigby is a visual artist and a 2006 Pew Fellow.

Grants & Grantees

Established in 1963, Pennsylvania Ballet has extended its important Balanchine-based repertoire by presenting new works by a variety of contemporary choreographers.

Grants & Grantees

The Kimmel Center, Inc., best known as a presenting organization and home of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Opera Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Ballet, is one of the most well-attended cultural venues in Philadelphia.

Pew Fellow Raphael Xavier takes his Center-supported autobiographical dance, The Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance, to Chicago.

In an article for The Pew Charitable Trusts’ Trust Magazine, Tom Infield explores how the Center fulfills Pew’s long-standing commitment to arts and heritage in the region by supporting projects that reach a wide range of audiences.

Pew Fellow Geoff Sobelle and theater artist Charlotte Ford presented a post-apocalyptic absurdist tale of human extinction.

Grants & Grantees

DataArts seeks to strengthen the nonprofit arts and cultural sector’s vitality, performance, and public impact by equipping organizations to collect, learn from, and use data effectively.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Zeena Parkins is a pioneer of contemporary harp practice and performance, has extended the language of the harp with unusual playing techniques, preparations, and layers of electronic processing.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Since the late 1970s, Danny Yung has established a reputation as one of Hong Kong’s most influential and pioneering artists.