Fall Premieres and Openings: Inspired by Bergman Films, Telenovelas, School Closings, and More

1/6: Students at the closed Fairhill Elementary School on May 1, 2015 for the launch of Temple Contemporary’s Center-funded reFORM.
2/6: After the Rehearsal/Persona by Toneelgroep Amsterdam. Photo © Jan Versweyveld.
3/6: Available Light at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 1983. Photo by Tom Vinetz. Performers: Lucinda Childs, Nan Friedman, Meg Harper, Janet Kaufman, Priscilla Newell, Steve Bromer, Michael Ing, Erin Matthiessen, Daniel McCusker, Ande Peck, and Garry Reigenborn.
4/6: Thaddeus Phillips as Barry Seal, for Alias Ellis MacKenzie. Courtesy of the artist.
5/6: Silvia Gruner, Yo soy esa simetría (I Am That Symmetry), 1991, video (14 minutes). Photo © Silvia Gruner.
6/6: Playgrounds for Useful Knowledge Neighborhood Convening, June 29, 2015. 632 Jackson Street. Photo by Steve Weinik. Courtesy of the City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program.

Fall kicks off with a packed schedule of Center-funded projects, including exhibition openings from Temple Contemporary and The Galleries at Moore, and performance premieres at the 2015 Fringe Festival that push the boundaries of genre and form. Visit our Events page to see more upcoming Center-funded projects and programs.

reFORM Installation Opening
August 28

Temple Contemporary opens a major installation by artist and Pew Fellow Pepón Osorio for their project, reFORM. The materials for the immersive exhibition and classroom, which responds to 2013 Philadelphia school closings, were salvaged from the former Fairhill Elementary School in a collaborative event with students, parents, teachers, and administrators.

After the Rehearsal/Persona by Toneelgroep Amsterdam. Photo © Jan Versweyveld.

After the Rehearsal/Persona
September 3–5

FringeArts presents the US premiere of After the Rehearsal/Persona as part of the 2015 Fringe Festival. In this work, director Ivo van Hove and his Dutch theater company, Toneelgroep Amsterdam reimagine two Ingmar Bergman screenplays for the stage, examining how film texts can influence the process of making live theater.

Available Light at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 1983. Photo by Tom Vinetz. Performers: Lucinda Childs, Nan Friedman, Meg Harper, Janet Kaufman, Priscilla Newell, Steve Bromer, Michael Ing, Erin Matthiessen, Daniel McCusker, Ande Peck, and Garry Reigenborn.

Available Light
September 10–12

A monumental production of dance, light, sound, and architecture from choreographer Lucinda Childs, architect Frank Gehry, and composer John Adams, Available Light will be reconstructed and reimagined at the 2015 Fringe Festival.

Thaddeus Phillips as Barry Seal, for Alias Ellis MacKenzie. Courtesy of the artist.

Alias Ellis MacKenzie
September 11–13 and 15–19

Pew Fellow Thaddeus Phillips premieres Alias Ellis MacKenzie, part of the 2015 Fringe Festival and the follow-up to last spring’s The Incredibly Dangerous Astonishing Lucrative and Potentially Completely True Adventures of Barry Seal. Inspired by Phillips’ experiences working on Colombian telenovela Alias El Mexicano, this bilingual work combines the design and aesthetics of film, television, and live theater.

Silvia Gruner, Yo soy esa simetría (I Am That Symmetry), 1991, video (14 minutes). Photo © Silvia Gruner.

Strange Currencies: Art & Action in Mexico City, 1990–2000
September 19–December 12

The Galleries at Moore College of Art & Design present Strange Currencies, articulating a history for the artist-run spaces that emerged in Mexico City in the 1990s. This show will explore questions about artistic ecosystems through visual art, outside performances, and a film program, and will include artworks that have never been shown outside of Mexico.

Playgrounds for Useful Knowledge Neighborhood Convening, June 29, 2015. 632 Jackson Street. Photo by Steve Weinik. Courtesy of the City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program.

Playgrounds for Useful Knowledge: Mifflin Square Alliance Festival
September 19

Mural Arts and Cohabitation Strategies host a lively celebration of South Philadelphia’s diverse cultures, organized in collaboration with community members and neighborhood civic organizations. Part of Mural Arts’ Restored Spaces initiative, this event includes live music, dance, and storytelling, as well as activities and workshops for all ages, a South Philly Food Contest, and more.

Grants & Grantees

Melanie Stewart Dance Theatre presented this festival, which provides resources to Philadelphia choreographers for rehearsals, classes, and showings.

Collaborators & Colleagues

David Allison is manager of onsite programs at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, where his most recent projects include writing and developing a multimodal show on the science of flight.

Grants & Grantees

Cliveden of the National Trust is an 18th-century historic house and the site of the 1777 Battle of Germantown. A National Historic Landmark, Cliveden was the summer home of prominent colonial attorney Benjamin Chew.

AXIS Dance Company performed in residence at Montgomery County Community College, coinciding with the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Catherine Morris is curator at the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum.

Grants & Grantees

Act II Playhouse produced this regional premiere by Irish playwright Sebastian Barry, which won the Critics’ Circle Award for Best New Play.

The library that Benjamin Franklin founded—one of the first in the country—is the only University of Pennsylvania institution to have been in continuous operation since 1750.

Grants & Grantees

Linda Cordell is a visual artist and a 2003 Pew Fellow.

A tour of the Wharton Esherick Museum and Studio, organized by the James A. Michener Art Museum as part of Paul Evans: Crossing Boundaries and Crafting Modernism.

Grants & Grantees

Foley, a 2012 Pew Fellow, explores how every movement, no matter how ordinary or seemingly inconsequential, informs a responding movement, and so on, in an ongoing creative feedback loop.

The Happy Show, presented at the Institute of Contemporary Art, focused on Stefan Sagmeister’s 10-year exploration of happiness and was conceived as a series of interactive investigations on the subject.

An award-winning composer-vocalist, Bielawa has worked with Anthony Braxton, Philip Glass Ensemble, and John Zorn. We asked her: How is technology impacting our expectations of live music?