Pew Fellow Brian Teare Awarded MacDowell Colony Residency

Brian Teare, 2015 Pew Fellow. Photo by Ryan Collerd.

The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage is pleased to announce that Pew Fellow and poet Brian Teare (2015) has been awarded a residency through the Center’s ongoing partnership with MacDowell Colony, one of the oldest and most prestigious artist residency programs in the country.

Teare will begin his residency this April, and plans to make progress on a forthcoming book. “I’ll be attempting to work with documentary materials about industrial waste and the toxicity of everyday life, and… work those documents into poems about the line between urban life and the ecosystems and watersheds urban life is a part of,” Teare says.

“I’ve been to MacDowell twice before, but it’s been over a decade since I was there. Those residencies turned into the most productive weeks of my writing life, so I’m looking forward to being immersed again in poetry so intensely. The residencies also yielded friendships with visual artists that have produced years of cross-disciplinary conversation and collaboration…, so I also look forward to the possibility of more interdisciplinary relationships.”

The author of five full-length books, Teare’s latest publication, The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven, was recently released by Ahsahta Press. A former NEA Fellow in Literature, Teare has been a resident at Headlands Center for the Arts, and is a recipient of the Ruth Lilly Fellowship and the Wallace E. Stegner Fellowship. Learn more about Teare in his Fellows Friday Q&A >>.

The Center will announce additional residencies awarded through its partnership with the Alliance of Artist Communities later this year.

Learn more about artist residencies supported by the Center >>.



In this month’s Pew Fellows news highlights, visual artist Candy Coated designs colorful bikes with the Mural Arts Program and Indego, and composer Jennifer Higdon prepares for the premiere of her opera, Cold Mountain in Santa Fe. The Chicago Tribune profiles fiction writer Max Apple, and Poet Afaa Michael Weaver receives the 2015 Phillis Wheatley Book Award.

Grants & Grantees

Toshi Makihara is a 2013 Pew Fellow whose performance work effortlessly blends percussion with dance-like body movement.

When asked about his sense of ethical responsibility in creating work, Whit MacLaughlin of New Paradise Laboratories responded with a reflection on his place in the performance world.

Grants & Grantees

In 1996 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 28 dance and theater organizations in the greater Philadelphia region.

Grants & Grantees

In 1995 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 16 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 23 dance and music organizations in the greater Philadelphia region.

Center-supported performance projects and exhibitions continue to have successful presentations after their initial premieres in our region.

Collaborators & Colleagues

An employee of the Chicago History Museum since 1982, Russell Lewis currently holds the position of executive vice president and chief historian.

Grants & Grantees

Dancer, choreographer, and 2011 Pew Fellow Tania Isaac presented a performance installation in June 2013, at which audiences were encouraged to share their thoughts through photos, writing, and self-recordings.

Percussionist and Pew Fellow Pablo Batista presents El Viaje (The Journey), a new performance work.

An array of imaginative public installations and creative community programs led by local artists and historians introduced audiences to the rich architectural heritage of the three-mile Philadelphia Rail Park, and culminated in a summer 2016 installment of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society’s popular Pop Up Garden.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Composer Lee Hyla’s musical background includes extensive experience as a pianist in new music, rock, and free improvisation.

Grants & Grantees

Raphael Xavier (Pew Fellow, 2013) has practiced “breaking,” an acrobatic street dance style commonly known as breakdancing, since 1983.