Philadelphia Folklore Project

Updated
1 Dec 2016

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Liberian Women's Chorus for Change: Fatu Gayflor, Marie Nyenabo, Zaye Tete, and Tokay Tomah, 2013. Photo by Anna Mulé, courtesy of the Philadelphia Folklore Project.

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Participants at a Philadelphia Folklore Project tatreez workshop, in conjunction with the exhibition Tatreez: Needlework of Palestinian women from Philadelphia, curated by Nehad Khader. Photo courtesy of the Philadelphia Folklore Project.

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Palestinian needlework (tatreez) artists Wafai Dias, Maisaloon Dias, Alia Sheikh-Yousef, and Nehad Khader look at work. Tatreez patterns from women’s home villages, now occupied or destroyed, are assertions of Palestinian history. From the exhibition Tatreez: Needlework of Palestinian women from Philadelphia, curated by Nehad Khader. Photo courtesy of the Philadelphia Folklore Project.

Supporting, documenting and presenting Philadelphia area folk arts, the Philadelphia Folklore Project (PFP) is committed to sustaining community cultural knowledge. Since its founding 1987, PFP has worked in close collaboration with local grassroots groups, producing documentaries, exhibitions, performances, and public programs which share the work, culture, and histories of these communities with a larger audience. The Center has supported many iterations of Dance Happens Here, a series that presents dancers who share their cultural lineage through movement. Through a 2013 Center grant, PFP tested a "pop-up" performance-based approach to interpreting the individual histories of recent African immigrants to Philadelphia, which aims to engage these communities in meaningful social change. Center support is assisting PFP with its upcoming leadership transition and the development of its Folklore Congress: an annual event that serves over 300 members of the folk arts community. A 2014 Center grant will allow them to addresses urgent issues of violence against women in Philadelphia's growing Liberian community through performances of the Liberian Women's Chorus for Change.