Headlong

1/6: The Quiet Circus performance at Washington Avenue Green. Photo by Maiko Matsushima.
2/6: Kendra, Kassean, and Kenya McQueen rehearsing in studio for Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town Is a Mystery. Photo by Andrew Simonet.
3/6: Princess Bostick and Adam Bostick rehearse in the studio for Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town Is a Mystery. Photo by Andrew Simonet.
4/6: Tobie Hoffman performs in Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town Is a Mystery. Photo by Kevin Monko.
5/6: Andrew Simonet, Adam Bostick, David Brick, Lea Bostick, and Princess Bostick in rehearsal for Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town Is a Mystery. Photo courtesy of Andrew Simonet.
6/6: Tobie Hoffman performs in Headlong Dance Theater’s This Town Is a Mystery. Photo by Kevin Monko.

Founded in 1993 by David Brick, Andrew Simonet, and Amy Smith, and now under the co-direction of Brick and Smith, Headlong is one of Philadelphia’s most audacious performance groups, having created over 40 dance works. The group creates collaboratively, with a focus on process, formal experimentation, audience engagement, and site-specificity. In 2011, with Center support, Headlong presented This Town Is a Mystery, a project that brought dance directly into four private homes of Philadelphia citizens—where the members of those households became the dancers. In 2016, Headlong received Center support to present The Quiet Circus, a year-long series of participatory practices conceived as an ongoing public performance at Washington Avenue Green, a one-acre site on the Delaware River waterfront.


References

Collaborators & Colleagues

Dr. Ian Bogost is a video game designer, critic, and researcher. In fall 2012, he visited the Center as part of a series on “gamification” in the arts and culture sector.

Two Center-funded performance projects—Supper, People on the Move and Facing Front: Lectures and Performance by Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion—culminated at the end of June, gaining media attention from several regional news outlets.

Grants & Grantees

People’s Light & Theatre Company’s project brought six playwrights from across the country to the theater’s campus to develop new work inspired by the region’s diverse communities.

Having created this work over the course of a decade, Malavika Sarukkai pays homage to the sacred river Ganga and its importance in Indian culture, history, the environment, and spirituality.

Center-supported performance projects and exhibitions continue to have successful presentations after their initial premieres in our region.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Sarah Lutman has worked in the arts and nonprofit sector for the past 35 years, and she is currently an independent consultant and entrepreneur.

Grants & Grantees

Dancer, choreographer, and 2011 Pew Fellow Tania Isaac presented a performance installation in June 2013, at which audiences were encouraged to share their thoughts through photos, writing, and self-recordings.

Throughout Dancing around the Bride’s run at the Barbican Art Gallery in London, the exhibition received media attention from a number of publications.

On March 23, 2012, The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage hosted Alan Brown of WolfBrown, and Brad Erickson and Clayton Lord of Theatre Bay Area, for an event that presented an important national study on the “intrinsic impact” and value of the arts.

Grants & Grantees

Max Apple (Pew Fellow, 2010) has been described as a “writer’s writer,” a dedicated author of short fiction who writes with precision and control.

Whitney Kimball, Vox Populi Gallery’s third AUX Curatorial Fellow, presents “The Videofreex Pirate TV” and a Q&A with Skip Blumberg and Nancy Cain, the third program in the “Schmart World” series.

We asked Oliver, a choreographer and dance professor, “Should we dance in museums?”