Philadelphia Folklore Project

1/3: Liberian Women’s Chorus for Change: Fatu Gayflor, Marie Nyenabo, Zaye Tete, and Tokay Tomah, 2013. Photo by Anna Mulé, courtesy of the Philadelphia Folklore Project.
2/3: Participants at a Philadelphia Folklore Project tatreez workshop, in conjunction with the exhibition Tatreez: Needlework of Palestinian women from Philadelphia, curated by Nehad Khader. Photo courtesy of the Philadelphia Folklore Project.
3/3: Palestinian needlework (tatreez) artists Wafai Dias, Maisaloon Dias, Alia Sheikh-Yousef, and Nehad Khader look at work. Tatreez patterns from women’s home villages, now occupied or destroyed, are assertions of Palestinian history. From the exhibition Tatreez: Needlework of Palestinian women from Philadelphia, curated by Nehad Khader. Photo courtesy of the Philadelphia Folklore Project.

Supporting, documenting and presenting Philadelphia area folk arts, the Philadelphia Folklore Project (PFP) is committed to sustaining community cultural knowledge. Since its founding 1987, PFP has worked in close collaboration with local grassroots groups, producing documentaries, exhibitions, performances, and public programs which share the work, culture, and histories of these communities with a larger audience. The Center has supported many iterations of Dance Happens Here, a series that presents dancers who share their cultural lineage through movement. Through a 2013 Center grant, PFP tested a “pop-up” performance-based approach to interpreting the individual histories of recent African immigrants to Philadelphia, which aims to engage these communities in meaningful social change. Center support is assisting PFP with its upcoming leadership transition and the development of its Folklore Congress: an annual event that serves over 300 members of the folk arts community. A 2014 Center grant will allow them to addresses urgent issues of violence against women in Philadelphia’s growing Liberian community through performances of the Liberian Women’s Chorus for Change.

References

Center-supported performance projects and exhibitions continue to have successful presentations after their initial premieres in our region.

In fall 2011, the Association for Public Art was featured in USA Today Travel as “the main reason Philadelphia is now said to have more public art than any other city.”

Grants & Grantees

New Paradise Laboratories built this new Web-based engagement tool, which invites audiences to participate and collaborate with theater artists online.

Conductor Donald Nally and violinist Hanna Khoury on how tradition influences their approach to bringing together a classical Arab chamber ensemble and a Western choir in performance.

Grants & Grantees

Bartram’s Garden was the home of John Bartram, a Quaker farmer with a lifelong fascination with botany. Today the 45-acre garden is a National Historic Landmark on the banks of the Schuylkill River.

Setting the stage for the performances of Trisha Brown’s Early Works at the Barnes Foundation, Susan Rosenberg, scholar-in-residence at the Trisha Brown Dance Company, offers an overview of Brown’s career at the crossroads of dance and visual art.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Richard Maxwell, playwright and director, is the artistic director of New York City Players and a two-time Off-Broadway Theater Award winner.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Regina R. Smith has served as a program officer on the Arts & Culture team at the Kresge Foundation since 2008.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Kathleen McLean, principal of Independent Exhibitions, recently co-facilitated the Center’s project, No Idea Is Too Ridiculous, with Performa curator Mark Beasley.

Several Center-funded projects have received extensive international, national, and regional media coverage in recent weeks.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Emilya Cachapero oversees all of the Theatre Communications Group’s artistic and international programs, including grant programs and special events.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Cinnamon Catlin-Legutko is the President and CEO of the Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor, Maine, which presents the history and cultures of the Wabanaki people. She served as a panelist in Exhibitions & Public Interpretation in 2015.