Adelaide Paul

2007 Pew Fellow

Adelaide Paul, 2007 Pew Fellow. Directed by Glenn Holsten.

“The things to me that are the most interesting are the things that by their very nature have no answers.”

In 2004, a class in veterinary anatomy changed Adelaide Paul’s (b. 1961) work—both what she does to earn a living and the art work she creates. Paul now works as a teacher’s assistant in the gross anatomy lab at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine and she is also working on medical illustrations for a guide to the dissection of the goat. Her studio practice has also been greatly influenced by this experience, because while the animal form has been consistent throughout, she now possesses a greater knowledge of its internal structure. She states that “on a pragmatic level, rendering an animal accurately on the outside is vastly facilitated by understanding the organization of the parts on the inside.” Her works pose questions to the viewer regarding consumer/consumed/consummated relationships by juxtaposing found and fabricated objects evoking multiple possibilities for interpretation. Paul’s newest work involves large pieces covered in leather—a dichotomy between skin, clothing, and what lies beneath the skin.

Paul is represented by Clark + Del Vecchio in New York, where she had a solo exhibition in 2004 and has been included in several group exhibitions. In 2006, the Clay Studio mounted a solo exhibition of her work, Anatomies, Animali, Anime, which was the culmination of her residency there. In addition she has been included in exhibitions at Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA; Baltimore Clayworks, MD; Salinas Art Center, KS; and Neuhoff Gallery, New York City. She is the recipient of a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts fellowship and a Leeway Foundation Window of Opportunity grant.

References

Five Pew Fellows have been awarded artist residencies in 2015, supported by the Center’s ongoing partnership with the Alliance of Artists Communities.

Grants & Grantees

In order to examine the difficult topic of addiction and its consequences, Pushers uses celebrity culture as its lens, as a way to connect with West Philadelphia youth and encourage them to share their own experiences.

Grants & Grantees

In 2005 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 66 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Grants & Grantees

Enid Mark (1932–2008) was a visual artist and a 2001 Pew Fellow.

Grants & Grantees

Megawords (run by Dan Murphy and Anthony Smyrski, both Pew Fellows) is self-described as “an experimental media project” that takes the form of a biannual photography magazine, as well as related installation projects and public events.

Interdisciplinary artist Martha McDonald presents a site-specific installation and performance at RAIR’s recycling facility and artist space.

Grants & Grantees

Lisa Coffman is a poet and a 1993 Pew Fellow.

Grants & Grantees

Donald Camp is a photographer and a 1995 Pew Fellow.

Questions of Practice

Painter Dushko Petrovich offers his perspective on Katharina Grosse’s epic psychylustro—a five-mile-long “painting” sprayed intermittently along a stretch of train tracks in northeast Philadelphia.

Questions of Practice

We asked the 2013 Pew Fellow poets to share samples of their work. Watch Emily Abendroth read a selection from her poem “Always Hook a Gift Horsey Dead in the Kisser [An Invocation].”

Grants & Grantees

You have to almost exhaust yourself sometimes to let yourself say what it is, or do what it is, in the most honest way.

Grants & Grantees

Lamont B. Steptoe is a poet and a 2006 Pew Fellow.