Astrid Bowlby

2005 Pew Fellow

Pew Fellow, 2005
Visual Arts

References

Ceramist and Pew Fellow Lauren Mabry on her creative development, embracing the unexpected, and more.

Grants & Grantees

Greg “Hodari” Banks is a dancer and a 1992 Pew Fellow.

The Rosenbach of the Free Library of Philadelphia opened to the public in 1954 and is located in the former home of brothers Philip and Dr. A.S.W. Rosenbach, international dealers in rare books, manuscripts, and fine and decorative arts.

Collaborators & Colleagues

James Alan McPherson is the recipient of many national literary awards, including a Pulitzer Prize and a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship award.

Grants & Grantees

James Ijames’ (Pew Fellow, 2015) plays and devised works examine how class and gender intersect with race, drawing inspiration from historical texts, the media, and stories of his own family to deconstruct history and its established figures.

Grants & Grantees

For over 25 years, Network for New Music has been dedicated to commissioning and performing music by living composers.

Collaborators & Colleagues

A former member of the Trisha Brown Dance Company, Lisa Kraus has worked extensively as a performer, choreographer, teacher, and writer locally, nationally, and abroad.

In this month’s Pew Fellows news highlights, novelist Beth Kephart describes seeing the landscape of her unwritten novel through the eyes of videographer Lori Waselchuk. Composer Bhob Rainey makes music out of squid neurons and mathematical formulas, and poet Major Jackson discusses the simple act of paying attention.

This month in Fellows Friday news: Jamaaladeen Tacuma has been named as a 2014 Civitella Ranieri Foundation Fellow in residence, the 2013 Pew Fellow poets read at San Francisco State University, and much more.

For the first time in 40 years, the Philadelphia Museum of Art will reinstall and reinterpret its eight galleries of South Asian art, which include nearly 3,000 works spanning over 2,500 years.

Three concerts showcased classical Carnatic music of Southern India.

Grants & Grantees

FringeArts presented the only American showing of this production by Australia’s Back to Back Theatre—a company known for creating works by and for an ensemble of actors perceived to have intellectual disabilities.