Deron Albright

2012 Pew Fellow

1/2: Deron Albright, 2012 Pew Fellow. Photo by Colin Lenton.
2/2: The Destiny of Lesser Animals (trailer), 2011, directed by Deron Albright.

“My love and practice of cinema has revolved around my belief in its unique ability to combine the artistic, emotional, intellectual, and political.”

Deron Albright (b. 1975) has been a filmmaker since 1994, with work spanning documentary, installation, poetic animation, and short- and long-form narrative. His 2005 short film, The Legend of Black Tom, played at over 25 festivals worldwide and garnered 13 awards of excellence. In 2008, he was awarded a Fulbright Senior Scholar Fellowship to Ghana, where he lived with his family for a year and filmed his first feature film, The Destiny of Lesser Animals (Sibo ne kra, Dabo ne kra). The film, which premiered in 2011 as part of the prestigious Museum of Modern Art and Film Society of Lincoln Center’s New Directors/New Films program, is set in Africa. Focused on the emotional journey of its middle-class protagonist, the work avoids ubiquitous narratives of poverty, war, and starvation, which tend to provide audiences with a narrow and tragic view of the continent. It has been praised by festival audiences for its honest portrayal of contemporary life in this part of the world.

His current works-in-progress include Invisible Son, a modern drama of immigration co-written with actor Yao B. Nunoo, which is part of the 2012 IFP Emerging Film Project. Albright is also developing Leave Worry Behind, a road movie featuring the art and music of Richard Swift from the Shins; Molineaux, a historical boxing drama based on Albright’s award-winning short film “The Legend of Black Tom”; and Ceramic Flowers, a modern mash-up of The Odyssey and Ulysses, set in Las Vegas.

References

Questions of Practice

We asked the 2013 Pew Fellow poets to share samples of their work. Watch Emily Abendroth read a selection from her poem “Always Hook a Gift Horsey Dead in the Kisser [An Invocation].”

Grants & Grantees

Rebecca Medel is a visual artist and a 1999 Pew Fellow.

Finding a “form to contain [the mess]” is one way that 2013 Pew Fellow Jenn McCreary describes her motivation for writing poetry. An avid note-taker, she tasks herself to find forms for disparate ideas.

Since receiving his Pew Fellowship in 2012, Varrone has developed Box Score: An Autobiography, an app for iPad and iPhone that features work from his book Eephus, a collection of prose poems about baseball.

Grants & Grantees

In 2003 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 63 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Grants & Grantees

In 1999 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 46 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Collaborators & Colleagues

David Kiehl became curator of prints at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1993. Previously, he curated at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Wolfsonian Foundation in Miami Beach.

Grants & Grantees

Founded in 2002 by two composers, Chamber Music Now provided the Philadelphia community with original concert productions.

Collaborators & Colleagues

David Filipi has been a film curator and a key member of the Wexner Center’s curatorial team since 1994.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Dr. Leslie King-Hammond is an artist, curator, and graduate dean emeritus and founding director of the Center for Race and Culture at the
Maryland Institute College of Art.

Mayor Michael Nutter hails Sherlock, Philadelphia’s second-ever poet laureate, as one of the city’s “most talented homegrown artists.”

Grants & Grantees

“I see my work as representation of the first generation to grow up entirely under the umbrella of a ‘read-write’ culture,” 2010 Pew Fellow Kara Crombie states.