Emil Kang

Dr. Emil Kang serves as executive director for the arts at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, a senior administrative post created in 2005 to help unify and elevate the performing arts at the university. In that year, Kang introduced, and currently directs, the university’s first major multidisciplinary performing arts program, Carolina Performing Arts. In addition, Kang also serves as professor of practice in the department of music. Prior to coming to Chapel Hill, Kang served as president and executive director of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. Kang has also held positions with the Seattle Symphony, the American Composers Orchestra, and served as an Orchestra Management Fellow with the League of American Orchestras. In May 2012, President Obama nominated Kang to the prestigious National Council on the Arts. Kang served as a Center management panelist in 2013.

References

Collaborators & Colleagues

Aaron Landsman is a New York City-based playwright, actor, and teacher whose performance works combine formal experimentation and long-term community engagement.

Vox Populi and AUX Performance Space will host Ann Hirsch and Jacolby Satterwhite in conversation, organized by AUX Curatorial Fellow Jamillah James.

This project investigated various issues surrounding (co-)authorship in cultural production, asking questions around definitions of authorship, collaboration, audience participation, the influence of marketplace, and other concepts.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Regina R. Smith has served as a program officer on the Arts & Culture team at the Kresge Foundation since 2008.

Andrew McIntyre visited the Center in summer 2012 for a day of workshops on visitor behavior and new approaches to engaging arts audiences in the 21st century.

Grants & Grantees

InterAct Theatre Company is committed to producing socially and politically relevant work for theater.

Grants & Grantees

InterAct Theater Company began strategic and business planning processes in order to pursue new areas of programming focused on collaboration with other theaters.

In the second segment of our three-part conversation with Center Visiting Artist Ain Gordon, he discusses his work throughout his residency period, including his role in the Center’s Push Me, Pull You project.

Yancey considers whether arts organizations be expected to approach their businesses with the same degree of courage and creativity that they expect of presenting artists.

In fall 2011, the Association for Public Art was featured in USA Today Travel as “the main reason Philadelphia is now said to have more public art than any other city.”

Grants & Grantees

Musicopia has taken its education residencies to the next level with this initiative, which incorporates multimedia learning with instruction and performance.

Grants & Grantees

Art-Reach connects audiences with disabilities or economic disadvantages to the arts, serving as a conduit for those who want access to performances or cultural institutions.