Joy Feasley

2011 Pew Fellow

1/7: Joy Feasley, 2011 Pew Fellow. Photo by Colin Lenton.
2/7: Joy Feasley, Green, 2007. Photo courtesy of the artist.
3/7: Joy Feasley, Pow Wows or the Long-Lost Friend, 2007. Photo courtesy of the artist.
4/7: Joy Feasley, Last Picnic, 2007. Photo courtesy of the artist.
5/7: Joy Feasley, weaving spiders come not here, 2008. Photo courtesy of the artist.
6/7: Joy Feasley, Midnight Sun, 2008. Photo courtesy of the artist.
7/7: Joy Feasley, Vision, 2008. Photo courtesy of the artist.

“I wait patiently for the moments in the studio when I feel transported to an otherworldly landscape.”

“The major concern of my work is to paint the invisible,” says Joy Feasley (b. 1966). “This idea is most easily illustrated by holding a prism to sunlight, as it reveals a spectrum of colors, always there but not always visible.” A mid-career artist who arrived in Philadelphia from New England in the late 1980s, Feasley considers herself a landscape painter, though her landscapes forego trees, sunsets, and waves, and instead seek to describe a mood. Her work tends to be small-scale and intimate, depictions of supernatural scenes painted in rich, saturated colors that are a hybrid of abstract and figurative art. Feasley, a two-time recipient of Leeway Foundation Window of Opportunity grants, also works in sculpture, printmaking, and installation. She studied at Massachusetts College of Art, Cooper Union, and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Her work has been shown widely in Philadelphia, including solo exhibitions at Locks Gallery, Fleisher Art Memorial, and Vox Populi. She has also shown in group exhibitions in Raleigh, NC; Tokyo, Japan; Waltham, MA; and Brooklyn, NY. During a Center-supported residency at Santa Monica’s 18th Street Arts Center in May 2013, Feasley worked on paintings and installations for a two-person show (with 2013 Pew Fellow Paul Swenbeck), at Adams and Ollman Gallery in Portland, OR, which opened in June 2013.

References

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Questions of Practice

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