Julie Carr

Julie Carr is the author of several books of poetry and a 2011 recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship. Her first collection of poetry, Mead: An Epithalamion (University of Georgia Press, 2004) was selected by Cole Swensen for the University of Georgia Contemporary Poetry Prize. Her collection Sarah—of Fragments and Lines (Coffee House Press, 2010), was a National Poetry Series winner; and 100 Notes on Violence (Ahsahta Press, 2010) was selected by Rae Armantrout for the 2009 Sawtooth Poetry Prize. Her critical study, Surface Tension: Ruptural Time and the Poetics of Desire in Late Victorian Poetry, is published by Dalkey Archive. Before writing became her main focus, Carr danced for 10 years in New York with local companies and choreographers. Carr is an assistant professor of English at the University of Colorado, Boulder and is co-publisher, alongside her husband, Tim Roberts, of Counterpath Press.

References

Grants & Grantees

Painter and 2008 Pew Fellow Anne Seidman’s practice has allowed her to explore the nature of pure painting through abstraction, suggesting friction, awkwardness, and ultimately, a sense of self.

This music and movement performance will offer audiences a distinctive interpretation of Miguel de Cervantes’ four-century-old classic, Don Quixote, combining narrative elements and ballads drawn from the novel, recited in both Spanish and English, and accompanied by monophonic melodies, organ and vihuela works that are reminiscent of the sounds of Golden Age Spain.

Grants & Grantees

In 2007, the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 83 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Grants & Grantees

In 2001 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 57 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Grants & Grantees

Art-Reach connects audiences with disabilities or economic disadvantages to the arts, serving as a conduit for those who want access to performances or cultural institutions.

Over our first decade, the Center has been privileged to fund extraordinary work by our dynamic and talented community of practitioners. As we reflect on our history and set the stage for the future, we invite you to take a brief, retrospective journey with us through a lively video that looks back over this period.

Pew Fellow and former Philadelphia Poet Laureate Sonia Sanchez leads a poetry workshop exploring the history of Johnson House, Philadelphia’s only intact stop on the Underground Railroad.

Grants & Grantees

Orrin Evans (Pew Fellow, 2010) never stops thinking about the traditions and evolution of jazz music, as well as renewing jazz’s legacy in the African-American community.

Malavika Sarukkai, a leading Bharatanatyam dancer who challenges traditions of Indian classical dance, performed at the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in April 2014.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Arlene Shuler is president and CEO of New York City Center. A former dancer with the Joffrey Ballet, Shuler has also worked at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

Jennifer Higdon wins a International Opera Award for Cold Mountain, Geoff Sobelle’s one-man play The Object Lesson will be presented at New York Theatre Workshop, and a mid-career retrospective book of Bo Bartlett’s paintings is published.

Grants & Grantees

In 1995 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 16 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 23 dance and music organizations in the greater Philadelphia region.