Laynie Browne

2014 Pew Fellow

1/5: Laynie Browne, 2014 Pew Fellow. Photo by Ryan Collerd.
2/5: Laynie Browne. Photo by Kelly Writer’s House Staff.
3/5: Cover of Laynie Browne’s The Ivory Hour (a future memoir) (Spuyten Duyvil, 2013). Cover artwork by Laynie Browne.
4/5: Cover of Laynie Browne’s The Desires of Letters (Counterpath Press, 2010). Cover artwork by Susan Sanford.
5/5: Cover of Laynie Browne’s Acts of Levitation (Spuyten Duyvil, 2002). Cover photo by Francesca Woodman.

“My desire is not to direct or dictate an experience of the poem, but to study and open possibilities for perception.”

Laynie Browne’s (b. 1966) poetry explores notions of silence and the invisible, through the re-contextualization of poetic forms, such as sonnets (Daily Sonnets), tales (The Scented Fox), and letters (The Desires of Letters). Her current project, You Envelop Me, utilizes the elegy to investigate birth and loss within the context of the mourning process. “Attempts to illuminate once-hidden meanings are points of perforation, punctures in the fabric of writing,” says Browne. “I consider form as a container, lens, garment, dwelling, and means of locomotion.” Browne received her M.F.A. from Brown University in 1990. Her published works include nine collections of poetry, two novels, and a number of chapbooks. Her work has been anthologized in The Norton Anthology of Postmodern American Poetry, Ecopoetry: A Contemporary American Anthology, Poet’s Choice, and elsewhere. She’s a three-time recipient of the Gertrude Stein Award in Innovative American Poetry.

References

This month in Fellows Friday news: Vera Nakonechny is named a National Heritage Fellow by the National Endowment for the Arts, Alex Da Corte exhibits at White Cube, and much more.

Grants & Grantees

Odean Pope is a saxophonist and composer, and a 1992 Pew Fellow.

Lee is the publisher at Corollary Press and author of the poetry collections Underground National, That Gorgeous Feeling, and Solar Maximum, forthcoming from Futurepoem Press.

The Institute on Disabilities at Temple University was established in 1974 and works to advance the full societal inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities and their families.

Collaborators & Colleagues

After dancing as a member of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company from 1984 to 1993, and the White Oak Dance Project from 1994 to 1996, Patricia Lent teaches, stages, and conducts workshops at the Merce Cunningham Trust, where she is a Trustee and Director of Licensing.

Makihara’s performance work blends percussion with dance-like body movement, exercising a rigorous, systematic, and practiced process of experimentation and repetition.

The Library Company of Philadelphia hosts an opening reception for Common Touch: The Art of the Senses in the History of the Blind.

Grants & Grantees

In 2000 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 47 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage announced its 2014 grants in support of Philadelphia’s arts and cultural community today. They include 12 new Pew Fellowships of $60,000 each, 35 project grants in amounts up to $300,000, and two Advancement grants of $500,000 each.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Brian Rogers is a director, video artist, co-founder, and artistic director of the Chocolate Factory Theater in Long Island City, Queens.

Since 2011, The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage has provided recent Pew Fellows with opportunities to take sojourns outside of the Philadelphia area, for residencies intended to push their artistic practice and expand their horizons.

Meg Foley presents an exhibition of improvisational research and performance documenting up to 750 dances, which Foley performs on a daily basis at 3:15pm.