Laynie Browne

2014 Pew Fellow

1/5: Laynie Browne, 2014 Pew Fellow. Photo by Ryan Collerd.
2/5: Laynie Browne. Photo by Kelly Writer’s House Staff.
3/5: Cover of Laynie Browne’s The Ivory Hour (a future memoir) (Spuyten Duyvil, 2013). Cover artwork by Laynie Browne.
4/5: Cover of Laynie Browne’s The Desires of Letters (Counterpath Press, 2010). Cover artwork by Susan Sanford.
5/5: Cover of Laynie Browne’s Acts of Levitation (Spuyten Duyvil, 2002). Cover photo by Francesca Woodman.

“My desire is not to direct or dictate an experience of the poem, but to study and open possibilities for perception.”

Laynie Browne’s (b. 1966) poetry explores notions of silence and the invisible, through the re-contextualization of poetic forms, such as sonnets (Daily Sonnets), tales (The Scented Fox), and letters (The Desires of Letters). Her current project, You Envelop Me, utilizes the elegy to investigate birth and loss within the context of the mourning process. “Attempts to illuminate once-hidden meanings are points of perforation, punctures in the fabric of writing,” says Browne. “I consider form as a container, lens, garment, dwelling, and means of locomotion.” Browne received her M.F.A. from Brown University in 1990. Her published works include nine collections of poetry, two novels, and a number of chapbooks. Her work has been anthologized in The Norton Anthology of Postmodern American Poetry, Ecopoetry: A Contemporary American Anthology, Poet’s Choice, and elsewhere. She’s a three-time recipient of the Gertrude Stein Award in Innovative American Poetry.

References

Choreographer and Pew Fellow Lela Aisha Jones on the importance of “creative spirits” in her family, what motivates her to create, the Philadelphia arts scene, and more.

Grants & Grantees

Pew Fellow Robert Matthews’ drawings are representational with varying degrees of narrative. They are not illustrations but rather investigations of unsolvable questions.

Grants & Grantees

Emmet Gowin is a photographer and a 1994 Pew Fellow.

We speak to visual artist Tim Portlock, whose current body of work explores the dialogue between place and the formation of identity.

Grants & Grantees

In 2001 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 57 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Kyle “JustSole” Clark is a dancer and choreographer with expertise in hip-hop and street dance. He is the founder and artistic director of Just Sole Street Dance Theater.

Karen M’Closkey and Keith VanDerSys are 2013 Pew Fellows, founding partners of PEG office of landscape + architecture, and PennDesign faculty at the University of Pennsylvania.

In this month’s Pew Fellows news highlights, The Philadelphia Inquirer celebrates ten years of Martha Graham Cracker, the alter ego of theater artist Dito van Reigersberg. Poet Major Jackson has published a new book with W.W. Norton & Company, and visual artist Gabriel Martinez opens a solo show at The Print Center this fall. DJ King Britt and performance artist Kate Watson-Wallace will co-curate a new music series as part of the 2015 Fringe Festival in September.

Choreographer and Pew Fellow Tania Isaac (2011) presents an iteration of her Center-funded discovery project open notebook: crazy beautiful.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Richard Evans is co-founder and president of EmcArts, a New York City firm that works to strengthen the capacity and effectiveness of nonprofit arts and cultural organizations.

Grants & Grantees

Over the course of his 30-year career, percussionist and 2000 Pew Fellow Pablo Batista has performed, recorded, and toured with a range of leading jazz, R&B, Latin, pop, and gospel artists including Bono, George Howard, Alicia Keyes, Gerald Levert, Jeffrey Osborne, Eddie Palmieri, Teddy Pendergrass, Diane Reeves, Grover Washington, Jr., Musiq, Manny Oquendo’s Conjunto Libre, and the Philadelphia Orchestra.

The Institute on Disabilities at Temple University explored the potential of public performance to engage the community in a dialogue around disability issues.