Lori Waselchuk

2012 Pew Fellow

1/9: Lori Waselchuk, 2012 Pew Fellow. Photo by Colin Lenton.
2/9: Lori Waselchuk, Passing Through, 2008. Pigment print. From the Bridges project: “Love & Concrete” series. Photo courtesy of the artist.
3/9: Lori Waselchuk, The Causeway, 2008. Pigment print. From the Bridges project: “Love & Concrete” series. Photo courtesy of the artist.
4/9: Lori Waselchuk, Waiting for Evacuation Before Hurricane Gustav, 2008. Pigment print. From the Bridges project: “Love & Concrete” series. Photo courtesy of the artist.
5/9: Lori Waselchuk, Slippery When Wet, 2008. Pigment print. From the Bridges project: “Love & Concrete” series. Photo courtesy of the artist.
6/9: Lori Waselchuk, After the Mardi Gras Parade, 2008. Pigment print. From the Bridges project: “Love & Concrete” series. Photo courtesy of the artist.
7/9: Lori Waselchuk, George Checks Jimmie’s Breathing, 2008. Pigment print. From the Bridges project: “Love & Concrete” series. Photo courtesy of the artist.
8/9: Lori Waselchuk, Pall Bearers, 2008. Pigment print. From the Bridges project: “Love & Concrete” series. Photo courtesy of the artist.
9/9: Lori Waselchuk, Lloyd Bone (#73857) Drives the Funeral Hearse, 2008. Pigment print. From the Bridges project: “Love & Concrete” series. Photo courtesy of the artist.

“Making photographs that describe human connection is the least difficult part of my artistic mission. The challenge lies in presenting the work imaginatively and provocatively; to bring an audience to a new understanding of that love.”

Lori Waselchuk’s (b. 1964) photographs of post-Katrina New Orleans and the hospice at Angola Prison in Louisiana bring us into intimate contact with these complex subjects. Captivated at an early age by news photos in LIFE magazine, Waselchuk’s work is project-based and interactive; she engages in conversation and collaboration with the people she photographs, which often leads to new and unexpected artistic directions. Grace Before Dying, her photographic documentary about the Louisiana prison hospice, generated a publication and a traveling exhibition that showed in prisons and public spaces in Philadelphia; Boise, ID; Washington, DC; and elsewhere. Waselchuk’s images have appeared in magazines and newspapers worldwide, including Newsweek, Time, LIFE, the New York Times, and the Los Angeles Times. In 2013, she received a Leeway Transformation Award from the Leeway Foundation.

With support from the Center, Waselchuk attended a National Press Photographers Association multimedia immersion workshop in May 2013, in order to learn new skills in this area. She is currently interviewing and photographing block captains in various Philadelphia neighborhoods for a new portrait and multimedia project, Them That Do, that reveals the individual and shared histories of the city’s diverse citizenry. In the spring of 2014, Waselchuk was featured in a photography exhibition at the Mainline Art Center in Haverford, PA: Humankind, which focused on social responsibility, portraiture, and the photo essay.

References

Grants & Grantees

William Larson is a media artist and a 2001 Pew Fellow.

Grants & Grantees

Emily Brown is a visual artist and a 2000 Pew Fellow.

Grants & Grantees

Frances Negrón-Muntaner is a filmmaker and a 1994 Pew Fellow.

Frank Sherlock is named Philadelphia’s new poet laureate, William Daley receives a solo exhibition at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, and poets Teresa Leo, Pattie McCarthy, and Jenn McCreary release new books.

Grants & Grantees

In 2002 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 57 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Grants & Grantees

Kidwell’s poignant, performer-driven theater work addresses the complexities of race and notions of American history with sharp intelligence and wry humor.

First Person Arts prototyped a project which brought together diverse groups of people to create “museum exhibitions” that documented their lives.

Questions of Practice

We speak to poet J.C. Todd, whose current work-in-progress is a collection of sonnets that “complicates and contemporizes the tradition of war poems.”

The Mann Center for the Performing Arts presents a diverse range of programming in a beautiful park setting.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Mara Isaacs is the founder and director of Octopus Theatricals LLC, a company dedicated to producing and consulting in the performing arts.

The prize, established in 1981, “recognizes exemplary and provocative work by young practitioners and provides a public forum for the exchange of their ideas.”

An actor, director, stage designer, and playwright, Thaddeus Phillips “creates visual spectacles that take audiences to new frontiers.”