Sharon Hayes

2016 Pew Fellow

1/5: Sharon Hayes, 2016 Pew Fellow. Photo by Ryan Collerd.
2/5: Sharon Hayes, 2016 Pew Fellow. Photo by Ryan Collerd.
3/5: ’77, Sharon Hayes, 2014, installation view at Andrea Rosen Gallery. Photo by Lance Brewer.
4/5: There’s So Much I Want to Say to You, Sharon Hayes, 2012, solo exhibition, Whitney Museum of American Art.
5/5: Sharon Hayes, Women of the World Unite: they said., 2014, Pier 54 commissioned and produced by Friends of the High Line. Photo by Liz Ligon, courtesy of the artist.

“I have been formed by an experience of the political world as both intensely intimate and profoundly public. These experiences mark my work more deeply than any other I’ve had in my life.”

Sharon Hayes (b. 1970) employs various mediums—including video, performance, installation, and photography—to probe the complex intersections of history, politics, and speech within private and public spaces. Hayes’ work is concerned with interrogating the present political moment, often through works staged “in the street,” a practice that she says arose from her “interest in public speech and the conditions of public address.” Her current large-scale project, Ricerche, began in 2013 and uses a series of single-channel video, photo, projection, and performance installations for an inquiry into sexuality in contemporary America. Her work has been shown at the Guggenheim Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Tate Modern, the 55th International Venice Biennale, and Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, among others. The recipient of a 2014 Guggenheim Fellowship, a 2013 Alpert Award in the Arts, and a 2007 Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Fellowship, Hayes received an MFA from the University of California and currently serves as associate professor of fine arts in the School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania.


References

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Strange Currencies, this discussion will explore the proliferation of (e)Zines, artists’ books, artist-run presses, underground comix, and other small-circulation, self-published works from the 1990s to the present.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Craig Barton is a professor of architecture and urban design and director of the Design School at the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University.

Grants & Grantees

Named for Doylestown’s most famous son, the Pulitzer Prize-winning writer James A. Michener, this museum was founded in 1988 with a regional focus, housing a collection of Pennsylvania impressionist paintings.

Grants & Grantees

The Philadelphia Museum of Art’s mid-career retrospective of the work of photographer Zoe Strauss offered the first comprehensive assessment of the artist’s achievement to date.

Grants & Grantees

Dan Murphy and Anthony Smyrski work together as the artist duo Megawords. They are well known throughout Philadelphia for installations that are equal parts gathering space, artist studio, and storefront.

“My thinking as a curator has been informed by ‘other lives’ that I’ve been fortunate to live and I continue to think about exhibitions from the perspective of what’s new that can be brought to the table.”

Grants & Grantees

Fritz Dietel’s (Pew Fellow, 2007) inspiration comes from observation of botanic and aquatic natural forms. His pieces, quite labor-intensive, are mainly constructed from strips and shards of band-sawed wood.

Coming up in May, take part in multidisciplinary Center-funded installations and participatory events that consider representations of Philadelphia through monumental public art, a community’s and artist’s response to the loss of a school, and the intersections of historical and theatrical storytelling.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Astria Suparak is an independent curator and former director and curator of Carnegie Mellon University’s Miller Gallery.

Grants & Grantees

Built in Germantown from 1765–68, the Johnson House is a National Historic Landmark, documented as a site for Underground Railroad activities.

In conjunction with the reopening of its eight South Asian art galleries, the Museum will present a series of family-friendly events.

Grants & Grantees

The Slought Foundation conceived and built a long-term interactive sound room, closely modeled on a 1989 lecture/performance by American avant-garde composer John Cage.