Steve Zeitlin

Steve Zeitlin is the founding director of City Lore, an organization dedicated to the preservation of New York City’s—and America’s—living cultural heritage. Prior to arriving in New York, Zeitlin served for eight years as a folklorist at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. He has taught at George Washington University, American University, New York University, and Cooper Union. Zeitlin has served as a regular commentator for the nationally syndicated radio shows Crossroads and Artbeat, and he develops segments on “The Poetry of Everyday Life” for The Next Big Thing, heard on National Public Radio. He is the author and co-author of a number of award-winning books on America’s folk culture including A Celebration of American Family Folklore (Pantheon Books, 1982); The Grand Generation: Memory Mastery and Legacy (U. of Washington Press, 1987); City Play (Rutgers University Press, 1990); Because God Loves Stories: An Anthology of Jewish Storytelling (Simon & Schuster, 1997); and Giving a Voice to Sorrow: Personal Responses to Death and Mourning (Penguin-Putnam, 2001). Zeitlin has served on various panels at the Center—most recently as a management panelist in 2011.

References

The Philadelphia Inquirer featured the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts’ fundraising campaign for its Pennsylvania’s Top 10 Endangered Artifacts project.

When asked about his sense of ethical responsibility in creating work, Whit MacLaughlin of New Paradise Laboratories responded with a reflection on his place in the performance world.

The Philadelphia Chinese Opera Society presented three traditional Beijing operas, two dramas and a love story, featuring three leading performing artists from China.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Phillip Seitz is a curator with a particular interest in using history to address legacies of slavery in the United States, and to attempt to begin processes of healing for African-Americans living with those legacies.

Poet and 2012 Pew Fellow Kevin Varrone (Pew Fellow, 2012) spent the past few years designing and building an app that traces the history of the Phillies, as well as his personal relationship with baseball.

The City of Philadelphia’s Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy manages the largest and oldest public art program in the country, while The Mayor’s Fund for Philadelphia seeks to improve quality of life for all Philadelphians by facilitating collaborations between the city’s public, private, and non-profit sectors.

Over our first decade, the Center has been privileged to fund extraordinary work by our dynamic and talented community of practitioners. As we reflect on our history and set the stage for the future, we invite you to take a brief, retrospective journey with us through a lively video that looks back over this period.

Project Row Houses’ founder Rick Lowe discusses Art Making and the Future of Presentation, as part of Gray Area’s Preservation Provocateur speaker series.

Nichole Canuso Dance Company is building an internal fundraising structure that can grow or contract as the scope of the company’s projects changes with each year.

This project investigated various issues surrounding (co-)authorship in cultural production, asking questions around definitions of authorship, collaboration, audience participation, the influence of marketplace, and other concepts.

Scribe Video Center worked with scholars and community representatives to discover stories, partners, and contributors for a project about the history of Muslim life in Philadelphia.

The major repository of the art of three generations of Wyeths (H.C, Andy, and Jamie), and steward of hundreds of acres of land where the artists worked, the Brandywine Museum is a national treasure.