Steve Zeitlin

Steve Zeitlin is the founding director of City Lore, an organization dedicated to the preservation of New York City’s—and America’s—living cultural heritage. Prior to arriving in New York, Zeitlin served for eight years as a folklorist at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. He has taught at George Washington University, American University, New York University, and Cooper Union. Zeitlin has served as a regular commentator for the nationally syndicated radio shows Crossroads and Artbeat, and he develops segments on “The Poetry of Everyday Life” for The Next Big Thing, heard on National Public Radio. He is the author and co-author of a number of award-winning books on America’s folk culture including A Celebration of American Family Folklore (Pantheon Books, 1982); The Grand Generation: Memory Mastery and Legacy (U. of Washington Press, 1987); City Play (Rutgers University Press, 1990); Because God Loves Stories: An Anthology of Jewish Storytelling (Simon & Schuster, 1997); and Giving a Voice to Sorrow: Personal Responses to Death and Mourning (Penguin-Putnam, 2001). Zeitlin has served on various panels at the Center—most recently as a management panelist in 2011.

References

Muslim Voices of Philadelphia, an oral history media project that explores the rich and diverse history of Muslim communities in the Philadelphia region, is being screened at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York.

The Philadelphia Inquirer featured the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts’ fundraising campaign for its Pennsylvania’s Top 10 Endangered Artifacts project.

Grants & Grantees

In 1997 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 46 dance, music, and theater organizations in the greater Philadelphia region.

Grants & Grantees

Historic Germantown is a collaborative of 15 historic houses, museums, and landscapes in the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia. The sites have worked together for decades, gradually building their collective capacity in both infrastructure and interpretation.

Informed by personal experiences with tinnitus, this collaborative performance series and electroacoustic installation will explore hearing damage, anchored by a handcrafted 20-foot long instrument of piano strings, amplifiers, and a mixer.

In this month’s Pew Fellows news, Jenny Sabin is honored with a Women in Architecture Award presented by Architectural Record, Benjamin Volta unveils a new mural, and we remember the late artist and teacher Nicholas Kripal.

Grants & Grantees

A community archive employed individual and community testimony to explore how immigration can affect a community over time.

Grants & Grantees

Operating onsite at Revolution Recovery, a recycling company in Northeast Philadelphia, RAIR (Recycled Artist in Residency) is an arts organization acting as an artist-in-residency program, a materials supplier for artists and designers, a mouthpiece for outreach and education, and a source for exhibitions.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Hema Rajagopalan is a bharata natyam dancer, teacher, and choreographer, and the founder and artistic director of Natya Dance Theatre, a professional touring company and school that has specialized in bharata natyam for the past 40 years. Rajagopalan served as a 2015 LOI panelist in Performance.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Travis Preston is dean of the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) School of Theater and artistic director of the CalArts Center for New Performance.

Grants & Grantees

Ally is a performance-as-exhibition, conceived by MacArthur Fellow Janine Antoni in collaboration with pioneering choreographer Anna Halprin and contemporary dance artist Stephen Petronio.

Grants & Grantees

This historical interpretation project compares domestic life in two centuries through the exploration of the 1767 and 1959 kitchens inside Cliveden’s historic Germantown mansion, revealing how architecture, design, and the technology of the times defined the experiences of those enslaved and in service and their relationships with the household’s family.