Sueyeun Juliette Lee

2013 Pew Fellow

1/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee, 2013 Pew Fellow. Photo by Colin Lenton.
2/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s “The Quiet Sun,” published in OmniVerse.
3/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
4/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
5/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
6/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.

“I write as personally as I can, just perhaps not in the way most people would expect.”

Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s (b. 1977) poetry questions concepts of birthright, lineage, and homeland, investigating relationships between people and the places they inhabit. A Korean-American poet, her work illustrates complexities of contemporary identity and addresses the limitations of terms we often use to define ourselves. “I am not interested in asserting a particular identity,” she says. Lee is the author of Underground National (Factory School Press, 2010), That Gorgeous Feeling (Coconut Books, 2008), and Solar Maximum, forthcoming from Futurepoem Press in 2015. She holds several degrees, including an MFA in poetry from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and she has read nationally at venues including the Territories Symposium at Naropa University in Boulder, CO; Asian Arts Initiative in Philadelphia; and in New York City at St. Mark’s Poetry Project and Poets House. In addition to her writing, Lee publishes innovative work by multiethnic authors through Corollary Press, and teaches creative writing at the University of the Arts and Richard Stockton College. She also edits for The Margins, the web magazine of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, and EOAGH: A Journal of the Arts.

References

Dancer, choreographer, and 2013 Pew Fellow Raphael Xavier takes hip-hop techniques from the street to the stage and tells the autobiographical story defined by sacrifice, passion, and transcendence.

Grants & Grantees

In 1997 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 46 dance, music, and theater organizations in the greater Philadelphia region.

Grants & Grantees

In 2000 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 47 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Grants & Grantees

Mark Goodwin is a visual artist and a 1995 Pew Fellow.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Pulitzer Prize-winning composer, pianist, and professor Shulamit Ran is the Andrew MacLeish Distinguished Service Professor in the department of music at the University of Chicago.

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Collaborators & Colleagues

Jens Hoffmann is the deputy director for exhibitions and public programs at The Jewish Museum in New York City.

Swenbeck is a 2013 Pew Fellow and visual artist, and his fascination with the macabre has filtered into his idiosyncratic sculptures, paintings, photographs, and installations.

Dancer, choreographer, and Pew Fellow Raphael Xavier tells the autobiographical story of an artistic journey defined by sacrifice, passion, and transcendence.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Cheng-Chieh Yu began her performing career with Cloud Gate Dance Theater of Taiwan. She is an associate professor in UCLA’s department of world arts and cultures/dance.

Grants & Grantees

In 1995 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 16 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 23 dance and music organizations in the greater Philadelphia region.

Grants & Grantees

Internationally noted artist Michael Rakowitz will weave the stories of local Iraq War veterans and Iraqi refugees, cultural traditions, music, and found sound into a participatory performance at Independence Mall, combined with a ten-episode radio program for a national audience, providing an intimate, multifaceted, and sustained portrait of Iraq.