People

Sueyeun Juliette Lee

2013 Pew Fellow

1/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee, 2013 Pew Fellow. Photo by Colin Lenton.
2/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s “The Quiet Sun,” published in OmniVerse.
3/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
4/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
5/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
6/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.

“I write as personally as I can, just perhaps not in the way most people would expect.”

Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s (b. 1977) poetry questions concepts of birthright, lineage, and homeland, investigating relationships between people and the places they inhabit. A Korean-American poet, her work illustrates complexities of contemporary identity and addresses the limitations of terms we often use to define ourselves. “I am not interested in asserting a particular identity,” she says. Lee is the author of Underground National (Factory School Press, 2010), That Gorgeous Feeling (Coconut Books, 2008), and Solar Maximum, forthcoming from Futurepoem Press in 2015. She holds several degrees, including an M.F.A. in poetry from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and she has read nationally at venues including the Territories Symposium at Naropa University in Boulder, CO; Asian Arts Initiative in Philadelphia; and in New York City at St. Mark’s Poetry Project and Poets House. In addition to her writing, Lee publishes innovative work by multiethnic authors through Corollary Press, and teaches creative writing at the University of the Arts and Richard Stockton College. She also edits for The Margins, the web magazine of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, and EOAGH: A Journal of the Arts.

References

Bowerbird produced a multi-day festival featuring works composed by Morton Feldman, as well as programs presented with the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Rotunda.

Five Pew Fellows have been awarded artist residencies in 2014, part of the ongoing partnership between The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, the Alliance of Artists Communities, and four North American artist residency programs.

Juggler, playwright, and solo theater artist Sara Felder developed and produced the world premiere of a whimsical theatrical reflection on art, aging, and grief.

People

Talvin Wilks is a playwright, director and dramaturg. His plays include Tod, the boy, Tod, The Trial of Uncle S&M, Bread of Heaven, and An American Triptych.

The Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance is an evening-length autobiographical dance, the culmination of Philadelphia-based breakdancer Raphael Xavier’s 30 years of experience in hip-hop genres. Xavier, a 2013 Pew Fellow, plays with the rhythms of rap, break dancing and narrative to draw parallels between the performer’s body and the stage itself.

Bruce Altshuler directs the museum studies program in the Graduate School of Arts and Science at New York University.

Margie Strosser is a filmmaker and a 1994 Pew Fellow.

People

Jens Hoffmann is the deputy director for exhibitions and public programs at The Jewish Museum in New York City.

Grants

In 2001 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 57 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Exhibitions funded by the Center, as well as Pew Fellow Ryan Trecartin’s 55th Venice Biennale installation, made several top 10 lists in Artforum’s Best of 2013 December issue.

Laynie Browne is a 2014 Pew Fellow and a three-time recipient of the Gertrude Stein Award in Innovative American Poetry. Browne’s poetry explores notions of silence and the invisible through the re-contextualization of poetic forms, such as sonnets, tales, and letters.

Pew Fellow Raphael Xavier takes his Center-supported autobiographical dance, The Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance, to Chicago.

Francine Prose is the author of many works of fiction, including Blue Angel, which was a finalist for the 2000 National Book Award.

Grants

In 2008, the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 73 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Dancer, choreographer, and 2013 Pew Fellow Raphael Xavier takes hip-hop techniques from the street to the stage and tells the autobiographical story defined by sacrifice, passion, and transcendence.

Built in Germantown from 1765–68, the Johnson House is a National Historic Landmark, documented as a site for Underground Railroad activities.

Grants

In 1998 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 52 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations in the greater Philadelphia region.

People

Enid Mark (1932–2008) was a visual artist and a 2001 Pew Fellow.

We asked the 2013 Pew Fellow poets to share samples of their work. Watch Emily Abendroth read a selection from her poem “Always Hook a Gift Horsey Dead in the Kisser [An Invocation].”

Project Row Houses founder Rick Lowe visited the Center in fall 2011 to speak with Pew Fellows about using creative solutions to renovate old homes to revitalize a community.

Debra Zimmerman is the executive director of Women Make Movies Women Make Movies, a nonprofit, New York-based film organization that supports women filmmakers.

Poet and 2011 Pew Fellow CAConrad is well known for poetry collections such as A Beautiful Marsupial Afternoon and The Book of Frank. His latest book is ECODEVIANCE: (Soma)tics for the Future Wilderness.

Elisabeth Sussman is curator and Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Most recently, she co-curated the 2012 Whitney Biennial.