Sueyeun Juliette Lee

2013 Pew Fellow

1/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee, 2013 Pew Fellow. Photo by Colin Lenton.
2/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s “The Quiet Sun,” published in OmniVerse.
3/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
4/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
5/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
6/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.

“I write as personally as I can, just perhaps not in the way most people would expect.”

Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s (b. 1977) poetry questions concepts of birthright, lineage, and homeland, investigating relationships between people and the places they inhabit. A Korean-American poet, her work illustrates complexities of contemporary identity and addresses the limitations of terms we often use to define ourselves. “I am not interested in asserting a particular identity,” she says. Lee is the author of Underground National (Factory School Press, 2010), That Gorgeous Feeling (Coconut Books, 2008), and Solar Maximum, forthcoming from Futurepoem Press in 2015. She holds several degrees, including an MFA in poetry from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and she has read nationally at venues including the Territories Symposium at Naropa University in Boulder, CO; Asian Arts Initiative in Philadelphia; and in New York City at St. Mark’s Poetry Project and Poets House. In addition to her writing, Lee publishes innovative work by multiethnic authors through Corollary Press, and teaches creative writing at the University of the Arts and Richard Stockton College. She also edits for The Margins, the web magazine of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, and EOAGH: A Journal of the Arts.

References

Grants & Grantees

Caribbean-American dancer-choreographer Tania Isaac (Pew Fellow, 2011) fuses choreography with personal documentary and social commentary.

Collaborators & Colleagues

David Sheingold is an independent consultant providing project development, strategic planning, and fundraising services for arts organizations and artists.

It gives us great pleasure to announce that the Pew Fellowships in the Arts will be raised to $75,000 for each Fellow in the 2015 grant cycle.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Catherine Wood is curator of international art and performance at Tate Modern.

Pew Fellow Raphael Xavier takes his Center-supported autobiographical dance, The Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance, to Chicago.

A conversation with Pew Fellow Jumatatu Poe, Donte Beacham, and LaKendrick Davis on the underground dance style of J-Sette and how Poe drew on its legacy for Private Places, a new Center-funded work.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Jock Reynolds has been the Henry J. Heinz II Director of the Yale University Art Gallery since 1998.

Cliveden, an 18th-century historic site once owned by the Chew family, envisioned new interpretive strategies and a series of programs based on its history of enslavement.

Pew Fellow and visual artist Benjamin Volta leads an artmaking workshop as part of Historic Germantown’s ongoing Center-funded project Elephants on the Avenue.

We speak to poet Catie Rosemurgy, whose wry and sharply imagined poems investigate the layered natures of identity, history, and narrative.

Grants & Grantees

Edgar J. Shockley III (Pew Fellow, 2008) sees his unique contribution to the world as reconciling African and European theatrical aesthetics, making us all more aware of what it means to be human.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Artistic director of Miro Dance Theater, Miller has shown her work in venues ranging from England’s Royal Opera House to New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art.