Sueyeun Juliette Lee

2013 Pew Fellow

1/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee, 2013 Pew Fellow. Photo by Colin Lenton.
2/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s “The Quiet Sun,” published in OmniVerse.
3/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
4/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
5/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
6/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.

“I write as personally as I can, just perhaps not in the way most people would expect.”

Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s (b. 1977) poetry questions concepts of birthright, lineage, and homeland, investigating relationships between people and the places they inhabit. A Korean-American poet, her work illustrates complexities of contemporary identity and addresses the limitations of terms we often use to define ourselves. “I am not interested in asserting a particular identity,” she says. Lee is the author of Underground National (Factory School Press, 2010), That Gorgeous Feeling (Coconut Books, 2008), and Solar Maximum, forthcoming from Futurepoem Press in 2015. She holds several degrees, including an MFA in poetry from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and she has read nationally at venues including the Territories Symposium at Naropa University in Boulder, CO; Asian Arts Initiative in Philadelphia; and in New York City at St. Mark’s Poetry Project and Poets House. In addition to her writing, Lee publishes innovative work by multiethnic authors through Corollary Press, and teaches creative writing at the University of the Arts and Richard Stockton College. She also edits for The Margins, the web magazine of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, and EOAGH: A Journal of the Arts.

References

Born in Venezuela, Kotain works with various Philadelphia-area nonprofit cultural organizations to teach others about his Arab and Latin musical traditions.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Caden Manson is a theater artist and a 2002 Pew Fellow.

Michael Djupstrom premieres a new piano quintet at the 2016 National Cherry Blossom Festival, Beth Kephart and Caroline Lathan-Stiefel display works at the Philadelphia International Airport, and The New York Times reviews Chris Forsyth’s new album.

Grants & Grantees

Thaddeus Phillips produced his largest show to date: an original musical about the delirious final days of Edgar Allen Poe’s life, which he spent traveling between New York and Richmond.

Grants & Grantees

The Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania is widely known for giving artists exhibitions at critical points in their careers.

Grants & Grantees

In 1999 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 46 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Grants & Grantees

J.C. Todd’s (Pew Fellow, 2014) poems investigate the impact of war, with an insistent eye and ear on language.

Grants & Grantees

Woon-Ping Chin is a poet and a 1995 Pew Fellow.

Visual artist and Pew Fellow Caroline Lathan-Stiefel on creating large-scale installations from ordinary objects, work-life balance, and more.

We speak to poet Catie Rosemurgy, whose wry and sharply imagined poems investigate the layered natures of identity, history, and narrative.

Grants & Grantees

In 2001 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 57 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Ranee Ramaswamy founded Ragamala Dance in 1993, and currently serves as co-artistic director. She is a master teacher, performer, and choreographer of the South Indian classical form of bharata natyam.