People

Sueyeun Juliette Lee

2013 Pew Fellow

1/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee, 2013 Pew Fellow. Photo by Colin Lenton.
2/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s “The Quiet Sun,” published in OmniVerse.
3/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
4/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
5/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
6/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.

“I write as personally as I can, just perhaps not in the way most people would expect.”

Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s (b. 1977) poetry questions concepts of birthright, lineage, and homeland, investigating relationships between people and the places they inhabit. A Korean-American poet, her work illustrates complexities of contemporary identity and addresses the limitations of terms we often use to define ourselves. “I am not interested in asserting a particular identity,” she says. Lee is the author of Underground National (Factory School Press, 2010), That Gorgeous Feeling (Coconut Books, 2008), and Solar Maximum, forthcoming from Futurepoem Press in 2015. She holds several degrees, including an M.F.A. in poetry from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and she has read nationally at venues including the Territories Symposium at Naropa University in Boulder, CO; Asian Arts Initiative in Philadelphia; and in New York City at St. Mark’s Poetry Project and Poets House. In addition to her writing, Lee publishes innovative work by multiethnic authors through Corollary Press, and teaches creative writing at the University of the Arts and Richard Stockton College. She also edits for The Margins, the web magazine of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, and EOAGH: A Journal of the Arts.

References

Pew Fellow Raphael Xavier takes his Center-supported autobiographical dance, The Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance, to Chicago.

Kinan Abou-afach is a cellist, composer, and classical Arab musician born in Damascus, Syria, who performs extensively with Philadelphia Arabic cultural organization Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture.

Organization

Temple Contemporary’s mission is “to creatively re-imagine the social function of art through questions of local relevance and international significance.”

Exhibitions funded by the Center, as well as Pew Fellow Ryan Trecartin’s 55th Venice Biennale installation, made several top 10 lists in Artforum’s Best of 2013 December issue.

Vera Nakonechny, 2008 Pew Fellow, has been named a 2014 NEA National Heritage Fellow.

Paul Fierlinger is an animator and a 1997 Pew Fellow.

Dean R. Gladden is in his eighth season with Houston’s Alley Theatre, where he is responsible for the administrative, financial, marketing, facilities, and development aspects.

Grants

In 1992 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 16 visual arts, dance, and music artists in the greater Philadelphia region, including Odean Pope and Judith Schaechter.

Since receiving his Pew Fellowship in 2012, Varrone has developed Box Score: An Autobiography, an app for iPad and iPhone that features work from his book Eephus, a collection of prose poems about baseball.

Grants

In 2007, the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 83 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Swenbeck is a 2013 Pew Fellow and visual artist, and his fascination with the macabre has filtered into his idiosyncratic sculptures, paintings, photographs, and installations.

Hafez Javier Kotain is a percussionist and teacher, fluent in both Arab and Latin rhythms.

Dancer, choreographer, and 2013 Pew Fellow Raphael Xavier takes hip-hop techniques from the street to the stage and tells the autobiographical story defined by sacrifice, passion, and transcendence.

The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage announced its 2014 grants in support of Philadelphia’s arts and cultural community today. They include 12 new Pew Fellowships of $60,000 each, 35 Project Grants in amounts up to $300,000, and two Advancement Grants of $500,000 each.

People

Sonia Sanchez is a poet and a 1993 Pew Fellow.

Grants

In 1993 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 16 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 13 dance organizations in the greater Philadelphia region.

People

Lily Yeh is a sculptor and a 1992 Pew Fellow.

Dancer, choreographer, and Pew Fellow Raphael Xavier tells the autobiographical story of an artistic journey defined by sacrifice, passion, and transcendence.

Tempesta di Mare implemented a three-year plan, which addressed new artistic opportunities for the orchestra, including a recording contract and social media expansion.

Grants

In 1994 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 16 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 34 dance and music organizations in the greater Philadelphia region.

Peter d’Agostino is a multimedia artist and a 1992 Pew Fellow.

People

Dr. Susan Leigh Foster is a choreographer, dancer, and scholar. Her “danced lectures” became a launching point for the third iteration of the Center’s danceworkbook series.

People

Caden Manson is a theater artist and a 2002 Pew Fellow.