People

Sueyeun Juliette Lee

2013 Pew Fellow

1/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee, 2013 Pew Fellow. Photo by Colin Lenton.
2/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s “The Quiet Sun,” published in OmniVerse.
3/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
4/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
5/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
6/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.

“I write as personally as I can, just perhaps not in the way most people would expect.”

Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s (b. 1977) poetry questions concepts of birthright, lineage, and homeland, investigating relationships between people and the places they inhabit. A Korean-American poet, her work illustrates complexities of contemporary identity and addresses the limitations of terms we often use to define ourselves. “I am not interested in asserting a particular identity,” she says. Lee is the author of Underground National (Factory School Press, 2010), That Gorgeous Feeling (Coconut Books, 2008), and Solar Maximum, forthcoming from Futurepoem Press in 2015. She holds several degrees, including an M.F.A. in poetry from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and she has read nationally at venues including the Territories Symposium at Naropa University in Boulder, CO; Asian Arts Initiative in Philadelphia; and in New York City at St. Mark’s Poetry Project and Poets House. In addition to her writing, Lee publishes innovative work by multiethnic authors through Corollary Press, and teaches creative writing at the University of the Arts and Richard Stockton College. She also edits for The Margins, the web magazine of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, and EOAGH: A Journal of the Arts.

References

This month, Afaa Michael Weaver is awarded the $100,000 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, Joshua Mosley’s work appears at the Whitney Biennial, King Britt curates at MoMA PS1, and much more.

People

Kent De Spain is a dancer and a 1992 Pew Fellow.

People

Composer Lee Hyla’s musical background includes extensive experience as a pianist in new music, rock, and free improvisation.

Five Pew Fellows have been awarded artist residencies in 2014, part of the ongoing partnership between The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, the Alliance of Artists Communities, and four North American artist residency programs.

People

Nava EtShalom is a poet and a 2006 Pew Fellow.

This month’s digest includes a BOMB Magazine interview with Chris Forsyth, international attention for Ryan Trecartin’s collaborative video installation at London’s Zabludowicz Collection, and a list of “must-see painting shows” from New American Paintings stocked with Pew Fellows.

We speak with Xavier—2013 Pew Fellow, hip-hop dancer, and Post-it aficionado—whose recent work The Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance was hailed by Dance Magazine as “artful and mesmerizing.”

The William Way LGBT Community Center is a non-profit organization serving the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender populations of Philadelphia and its nearby communities.

A 2012 Pew Fellow and Leeway Transformation Award winner, Waselchuk is interviewing and photographing Philadelphia block captains for Them That Do, a project which reveals the individual and shared histories of the city’s diverse citizenry.

People

John King is a composer, guitarist, and violist and the recipient of the 2009 Alpert Award in the Arts for Music.

Pew Fellow Raphael Xavier takes his Center-supported autobiographical dance, The Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance, to Chicago.

Sheryl Robin David is a craft artist and a 2000 Pew Fellow in folk and traditional arts.

When asked about his sense of ethical responsibility in creating work, Whit MacLaughlin of New Paradise Laboratories responded with a reflection on his place in the performance world.

Painted Bride Art Center presented the seminal duets of Bill T. Jones and the late Arnie Zane—challenging works that remain some of the most significant examples of postmodern dance to date.

People

Pew Fellow Paul Swenback developed a fascination with the macabre and occult at an early age, which has filtered into his idiosyncratic sculptures, paintings, photographs, and installations.

Grants

In 1999 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 46 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Directing My Dancers/Directing Myself allowed Nichole Canuso to reevaluate her choreographic practice, mentoring under U.K.-based dancer Wendy Houstoun.

The Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance is an evening-length autobiographical dance, the culmination of Philadelphia-based breakdancer Raphael Xavier’s 30 years of experience in hip-hop genres. Xavier, a 2013 Pew Fellow, plays with the rhythms of rap, break dancing and narrative to draw parallels between the performer’s body and the stage itself.

Grants

In 1998 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 52 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations in the greater Philadelphia region.

Grants

In 1994 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 16 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 34 dance and music organizations in the greater Philadelphia region.

Annabeth Rosen is a ceramist and a 1992 Pew Fellow.

Dancer, choreographer, and 2013 Pew Fellow Raphael Xavier takes hip-hop techniques from the street to the stage and tells the autobiographical story defined by sacrifice, passion, and transcendence.

People

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Paula Vogel’s current playwriting project is a Center-funded commission for Philadelphia’s Wilma Theater, based on Don Juan Returns from the War.