Sueyeun Juliette Lee

2013 Pew Fellow

1/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee, 2013 Pew Fellow. Photo by Colin Lenton.
2/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s “The Quiet Sun,” published in OmniVerse.
3/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
4/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
5/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
6/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.

“I write as personally as I can, just perhaps not in the way most people would expect.”

Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s (b. 1977) poetry questions concepts of birthright, lineage, and homeland, investigating relationships between people and the places they inhabit. A Korean-American poet, her work illustrates complexities of contemporary identity and addresses the limitations of terms we often use to define ourselves. “I am not interested in asserting a particular identity,” she says. Lee is the author of Underground National (Factory School Press, 2010), That Gorgeous Feeling (Coconut Books, 2008), and Solar Maximum, forthcoming from Futurepoem Press in 2015. She holds several degrees, including an MFA in poetry from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and she has read nationally at venues including the Territories Symposium at Naropa University in Boulder, CO; Asian Arts Initiative in Philadelphia; and in New York City at St. Mark’s Poetry Project and Poets House. In addition to her writing, Lee publishes innovative work by multiethnic authors through Corollary Press, and teaches creative writing at the University of the Arts and Richard Stockton College. She also edits for The Margins, the web magazine of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, and EOAGH: A Journal of the Arts.

References

The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage’s partnership with United States Artists (USA) allows Pew Fellows to participate in USA’s unique online fundraising platform to raise money and awareness about upcoming projects.

Grants & Grantees

Christopher Bursk is a poet and a 1995 Pew Fellow.

Grants & Grantees

Eileen Beff is a visual artist and 1994 Pew Fellow.

Grants & Grantees

In 2000 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 47 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Collaborators & Colleagues

New York City-based conceptual artist Fred Wilson is known for repurposing objects and artifacts to lead people to see them in a different way.

Kinan Abou-afach is a cellist, composer, and classical Arab musician born in Damascus, Syria, who performs extensively with Philadelphia Arabic cultural organization Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture.

“There is a hunger for a conversation about process,” says dancer and choreographer Tania Isaac, when asked about changes in audience expectations.

Grants & Grantees

Babette Martino (1956–2011) was a visual artist and a 2000 Pew Fellow.

Vera Nakonechny, 2008 Pew Fellow, has been named a 2014 NEA National Heritage Fellow.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Michèle Steinwald is an independent curator and dance producer, and former assistant curator for the performing arts at the Walker Art Center.

Grants & Grantees

In 2004 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 76 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Questions of Practice

A workshop and small grant opportunity, No Idea Is Too Ridiculous allows Center constituents to explore creativity and risk-taking.