Sueyeun Juliette Lee

2013 Pew Fellow

1/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee, 2013 Pew Fellow. Photo by Colin Lenton.
2/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s “The Quiet Sun,” published in OmniVerse.
3/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
4/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
5/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
6/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.

“I write as personally as I can, just perhaps not in the way most people would expect.”

Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s (b. 1977) poetry questions concepts of birthright, lineage, and homeland, investigating relationships between people and the places they inhabit. A Korean-American poet, her work illustrates complexities of contemporary identity and addresses the limitations of terms we often use to define ourselves. “I am not interested in asserting a particular identity,” she says. Lee is the author of Underground National (Factory School Press, 2010), That Gorgeous Feeling (Coconut Books, 2008), and Solar Maximum, forthcoming from Futurepoem Press in 2015. She holds several degrees, including an MFA in poetry from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and she has read nationally at venues including the Territories Symposium at Naropa University in Boulder, CO; Asian Arts Initiative in Philadelphia; and in New York City at St. Mark’s Poetry Project and Poets House. In addition to her writing, Lee publishes innovative work by multiethnic authors through Corollary Press, and teaches creative writing at the University of the Arts and Richard Stockton College. She also edits for The Margins, the web magazine of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, and EOAGH: A Journal of the Arts.

References

Grants & Grantees

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We speak with Xavier—2013 Pew Fellow, hip-hop dancer, and Post-it aficionado—whose recent work The Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance was hailed by Dance Magazine as “artful and mesmerizing.”

The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage is pleased to announce its 2015 grants in support of the Philadelphia region’s cultural organizations and artists.

Grants & Grantees

Neysa Grassi is a painter and a 1995 Pew Fellow.

Grants & Grantees

In 2005 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 66 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Professor of ethnomusicology at Harvard University, Richard K. Wolf specializes in the veena and mridangam Indian instruments, and has conducted extensive fieldwork in South Asia.

In this month’s Pew Fellows news highlights, novelist Beth Kephart describes seeing the landscape of her unwritten novel through the eyes of videographer Lori Waselchuk. Composer Bhob Rainey makes music out of squid neurons and mathematical formulas, and poet Major Jackson discusses the simple act of paying attention.

Grants & Grantees

In 2002 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 57 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.

With this production, New Paradise Laboratories enhanced and challenged the conventions of the live theatrical experience by merging theater and mobile technology.

Dancer, choreographer, and Pew Fellow Raphael Xavier tells the autobiographical story of an artistic journey defined by sacrifice, passion, and transcendence.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Harris Eisenstadt is a Toronto-born drummer, composer, and bandleader who has studied with respected names in jazz and improvised music, as well as in West African and Cuban drumming, and performed in genres ranging from film and theater to poetry and dance to contemporary classical and opera. He served as a 2015 panelist in Performance.

Grants & Grantees

In 1999 the Center awarded Pew Fellowships to 12 Philadelphia-based artists, and grants to 46 dance, music, theater, and visual arts organizations and practitioners in the greater Philadelphia region.