Sueyeun Juliette Lee

2013 Pew Fellow

1/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee, 2013 Pew Fellow. Photo by Colin Lenton.
2/6: Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s “The Quiet Sun,” published in OmniVerse.
3/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
4/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
5/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.
6/6: Excerpt from “On Light” by Sueyeun Juliette Lee, published in 1913: A Journal of Forms, issue 5, 2011.

“I write as personally as I can, just perhaps not in the way most people would expect.”

Sueyeun Juliette Lee’s (b. 1977) poetry questions concepts of birthright, lineage, and homeland, investigating relationships between people and the places they inhabit. A Korean-American poet, her work illustrates complexities of contemporary identity and addresses the limitations of terms we often use to define ourselves. “I am not interested in asserting a particular identity,” she says. Lee is the author of Underground National (Factory School Press, 2010), That Gorgeous Feeling (Coconut Books, 2008), and Solar Maximum, forthcoming from Futurepoem Press in 2015. She holds several degrees, including an M.F.A. in poetry from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and she has read nationally at venues including the Territories Symposium at Naropa University in Boulder, CO; Asian Arts Initiative in Philadelphia; and in New York City at St. Mark’s Poetry Project and Poets House. In addition to her writing, Lee publishes innovative work by multiethnic authors through Corollary Press, and teaches creative writing at the University of the Arts and Richard Stockton College. She also edits for The Margins, the web magazine of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, and EOAGH: A Journal of the Arts.

References

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