Toni Shapiro-Phim

Toni Shapiro-Phim. Photo courtesy of CounterPULSE.

Toni Shapiro-Phim is a cultural anthropologist with a specialization in the arts of Southeast Asia. She received her Ph.D. from Cornell University, writing about the relationship between war, dance and music in Cambodia, and has held research and teaching positions focused on arts and social justice at the University of California, Berkeley, Yale University and, most recently, at Bryn Mawr College. Co-editor of Dance, Human Rights and Social Justice: Dignity in Motion (2008), her writing has also appeared in Annihilating Difference: the Anthropology of Genocide (2002), The Encyclopedia of Asian Theatre (2007), The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance (2001) and other books, magazines, and journals. She is currently program specialist at the Philadelphia Folklore Project, where she conducts research about urban expressive culture and coordinates an arts and social change education program.

Shapiro-Phim has contributed various articles to the Center website, including a profile of Robert and Helene Browning of the World Music Institute for the American Impresario series.

Grants & Grantees

Kun-Yang Lin/Dancers is one of the country’s foremost contemporary Asian-American dance companies, celebrating the ability of dance to integrate body, mind, and spirit.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Hema Rajagopalan is a bharata natyam dancer, teacher, and choreographer, and the founder and artistic director of Natya Dance Theatre, a professional touring company and school that has specialized in bharata natyam for the past 40 years. Rajagopalan served as a 2015 LOI panelist in Performance.

Collaborators & Colleagues

Maria Bauman is the founder and artistic director of MBDance, which has received Harlem Stage Fund for New Work awards through the Jerome Foundation, among other honors. Bauman served on the Center’s Performance panel in 2014 and 2015.

Grants & Grantees

Opera Philadelphia will develop the American Repertoire Council, a national advisory body charged with assessing and deconstructing the company’s process for creating new operatic works.

Grants & Grantees

WXPN’s yearlong project explores the origins and evolution of zydeco, a form of African-American roots music that blends Creole traditions, blues, and R&B.

Hip-hop artists and scholars will explore and unpack the experience of racism through music and lyrics.

In March 2005, The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage invited choreographer and dance artist Wendy Rogers to lead a presentation and town hall discussion for dance makers and cultural practitioners.

As part of the ongoing retrospective Trisha Brown: In the New Body, Bryn Mawr College presents a conversation with former Trisha Brown Dance Company members Eva Karczag and Lisa Kraus.

Grants & Grantees

Established in 2004, Jazz Bridge is a hybrid nonprofit organization joining performance presentation with professional support services for regional jazz and blues artists.

Two Center-funded performance projects—Supper, People on the Move and Facing Front: Lectures and Performance by Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion—culminated at the end of June, gaining media attention from several regional news outlets.

This month in Fellows Friday news: Uri Caine receives rave reviews for his Philadelphia Freedom Festival commission, Nadia Hironaka and Matthew Suib’s exhibition at Locks Gallery is a Critics’ Pick on Artforum, and much more.

During the 2005–06 season, Philadelphia’s Dancefusion reconstructed Mary Anthony’s Women of Troy (1954). Dr. Linda Caruso Haviland prepared this essay for the accompanying symposium on dance preservation.